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Just for fun - older equipment - all in use!

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Just for fun - old/problematic equipment in use!

I figured you guys would want to see this.

I have never seen some of it before.

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Please give me some insight into this one!!! I was told that it was an oil filled electrical switch and that it is in use.

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I'm amazed that the SE copper bus bars would still be permitted outdoors, totally unprotected. Is there even a fence around that area? The stuff is live?

Marc

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Very old club of sorts is all that I can say.

Have you guys seen or heard of an electrical switch of the large type shown?

I've never seen oil filled switches like that or a capacitor bank like that.

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Yeah. I've worked on switches like that as well as capacitor banks, etc.

I've never seen oil-filled switches on 240V circuits. They're still used by utilities (under pressure) on utility lines, for transformers, switches and circuit breakers. It helps with insulation, cooling and with quenching arcs, prolonging the life of the contacts.

The capacitor banks suggest a prior use of that facility for industrial or manufacturing use that employed large motors. They are used to provide capacitive currents that cancel out inductive currents that result from the operation of electric motors. Lighting transformers (fluorescent ballasts included) also produce heaps of inductive currents that burden the utility power lines without transmitting any power. Some utilities will penalize a plant that doesn't clean their system of reactive currents because reactive 'power' is actually not power, just a ghost going back and forth between generator and motor and doesn't ever accomplish any work.

Marc

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Marc,

From your response on the switch, I am inferring that is super heavy duty switch which is designed to last a long long time outside. This is inside - and is probably ok for the next 10 years.

Am I inferring that correctly?

Thanks

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It doesn't look like a NEMA 3 to me but at this age, the only way to get even a remote idea of the condition of the switch is to visually examine it.

Marc

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If by visually examine, you mean me operating or opening a probably 90-year-old switch which is filled with oil in a small room with one exit, I will pass... Hehehe

Just kidding. I understand. I will recommend that someone else looks at it!

Thank you for your insight.

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Concerning the outside transformers and bus in the fence.

Is there any reason to believe that these would be newer than the rest of the 90 year old capacitor bank and mains based upon what is shown?

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I can't see any but then I wasn't around in 26'.

Are those PVC stub-ups? The ones bringing in power?

Marc

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Ok. This really fun info...

It is about the "Heinemann Magnette" breaker shown

In 1927, Heinemann developed an automatic protective device called a circuit breaker, and in 1930, Heinemann produced the first magnetic circuit breaker. Heinemann remains the leading manufacturer of OEM circuit breakers.

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In 1927, Heinemann developed an automatic protective device called a circuit breaker, and in 1930, Heinemann produced the first magnetic circuit breaker. Heinemann remains the leading manufacturer of OEM circuit breakers.

So much for the prior Solenoid types, the Remote Control Electro-Pneumatic types, and of course, the Motor Operated suckers.

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