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John Dirks Jr

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1 hour ago, mjr6550 said:

John, I see that the building is not insulated. Do you heat it? When I retire I would like to build a building for my hobbies. I am thinking about the best way (meaning cheapest) way to heat it.

Build it super tight and super insulated like Joe L did with his "barn." He heats his with the waste heat from his big-screen TV. 

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My local mechanic has floor heat in his commercial garage building with a natural gas boiler.

I was in there when the temperature was down below zero.  His building, though LARGE (6 bays) was plenty warm.  He said the cost was very economical too!

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I was thinking of tight and we'll insulated. Not real easy or inexpensive, but I would go that way to the extent practical. Floor heat would be a good way to go. Insulation below and at the perimeter would be necessary, but worthwhile anyway. There would be quite a lag between turning on the heat and coming up to temperature,  but may not be a big issue if the temperature is not turned down too low and working at 55 to 60 should be fine. Maybe lower with warm feet.

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the lag time is not that bad. Sure it is not instant and depending on how cold you let the slab get, it is a factor. Once it is set you leave it. This is not a setback optional way of heating.

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On 1/20/2018 at 6:43 PM, mjr6550 said:

John, I see that the building is not insulated. Do you heat it? When I retire I would like to build a building for my hobbies. I am thinking about the best way (meaning cheapest) way to heat it.

I heat with a kerosene jet type heater.  The building is not currently insulated in any way.  It also has a ridge vent so most of the heat I pump in goes right out the top.  If its 20 degrees outside, I can get the building up to about 50 degrees.  50 degrees is plenty warm when you're out of the wind and have plenty of Harpoon IPA in the mini fridge.

Here's the current beast I'm tackling.  My sons '79 Malibu wagon.  Changing a cracked flex plate, installing new upper control arm bushings and upper ball joints, new front shocks and a heater core since I broke it by pulling on the heater hose to remove it.

 

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Going off topic a little but I found out recently that the 5.9 Liter, 6 in line, Cummins diesel in my Dodge can be overhauled without removing the block from the truck.  Just remove the radiator, inter-cooler, AC condenser and oil cooler.  Grill is attached to the hood and camshaft slides out forward.  Might be a while before I need that though, it's only at 312K miles.  Still runs like the day I took it off the dealer's lot in 03'.

Edited by Marc

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I remember doing 'rings and bearings' on mid-50's trucks and sedans with the block in the car. The shop had a pit, tho, so you had good access from below. It was called a grease pit and cars needed a lot of grease every oil change.

I love that engine lift rig you bought, John. And dollies to push the car around in the shop, Pretty slick.

There a heat lamp on a pole that works good for when you're working in one place for a long time. I was thinking a kind of portable paint booth would be handy for trapping heat. Anyway, spring is just around the corner!

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Marc, that Cummins engine is a good one.  Is your truck automatic or manual transmission?  Dodge automatic transmissions have a bad reputation.

John, the dollies come in handy for sure.  With a longer car like the wagon, the garage is not long enough to have two vehicles end to end with room to work.  I can do it with two Mustangs though.  Anyway, rotating any car 90 degrees and pushing it to the back gives tons of work space for the project car while leaving more than adequate space to park two other cars in the garage.

Here's the cracked flexplate from the wagon.  It was still drivable  but making a noise similar to a rod knock.  Imminent failure for sure.

 

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What's a flexplate?

It's automatic. It's been serviced three times: 95K miles for defective torque converter that burned the clutches (warranty repair),  about 275 K miles for worn out clutches then again a week later when the a hole opened up on the rebuilt torque converter.

Edited by Marc

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A flexplate is the part that goes between the engine crankshaft and the torque converter on vehicles equipped with automatic transmission.  On manual transmission vehicles it's a flywheel.  Some people call it flywheel on auto trans vehicle too.  However, the correct name is flexplate.

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