Jump to content

Recommended Posts

House framed in 1900.  Looks like they sawed the pine right next door.  Lots of slab pieces in the skip sheathing and lots of scabs to make length.

P1010468.JPG

P1010471.JPG

P1010472.JPG

P1010473.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Using the live-edge pieces for sheathing was smart. 

Scabbing the rafters, not so much. Even in 1900, that was a dick move. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These rafters barely qualified as 2x4.  The steepness allowed them to get away with scabs.  Down in the crawl these guys notched away more than half of joist height to rest on ledgers.  It is something I see a lot of, but only rarely have I seen joist split as a result of over notching.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Jim Baird said:

These rafters barely qualified as 2x4.  The steepness allowed them to get away with scabs.  Down in the crawl these guys notched away more than half of joist height to rest on ledgers.  It is something I see a lot of, but only rarely have I seen joist split as a result of over notching.

I see split joists all the time. Maybe it's the difference between SYP and eastern white pine. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, AHI in AR said:

The steepness doesn't help when you account for wind load...

It likely fell short of compliance with the 1900 building code;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Chad Fabry said:

I see split joists all the time. Maybe it's the difference between SYP and eastern white pine. 

Now wait just a minute there...Southern Yellow vs Eastern White.  Is there a racist subliminal twist going on here? 😁

Edited by Marc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heck no Marc.  SYP is rated way higher than all those whites, which are lumped together under the SPF category which stands for spruce pine fir.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Les said:

I prefer Douglas Fir.

 

How about for floor framing?  I have a distant cousin who bought a house built in 1917 by a rich guy south of here.  He framed the whole thing from California redwood.  No telling what it cost him but the house is still standing straight.

Around here SYP or floor trusses are needed for any kind of span, and SYP has been degraded by the standards institutes and the codebooks because the "super trees" being raised now by the wood production experts are so pithy they fail the engineering tests applied by the raters.

Someone earlier mentioned bounce.  As an AHJ I inspected a modular with floor trusses that passed muster far as I could tell.  The owners had moved in a bunch of stuff too early, and when I walked across the dining room the dishes in the floor standing china cabinet all rattled.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...