Jump to content

Anchored masonry Brick


Recommended Posts

I'm not sure where to park this question.  I did a quick search and couldn't find anything.  I was going through my NHIE text book and one of the review questions showed a picture of the corner of what appears to be a brick exterior.  The pic is black and gray and kind of fuzzy.  The question asks, identify this type of siding.  The answer is Anchored masonry according to the answer key.  Are the anchors visible with this type of brick?  If not, how would you identify it and report it? 

Thanks in advance.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is the 2015 NHIE Home Inspection Manual.  The question is under the Reporting Findings section if you have the book.  The pic is literally the corner of a "brick" house.  It is so fuzzy that you cannot rule out even fake brick paneling.  I can upload a pic when I get home. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

So, with the NHIE, it helps to keep in mind that every question should have one undeniably correct answer and three distractors. The undeniably correct answer might not be a term or concept that you would use, but it will have at lease one reference source to back it up - that's almost always the building code or an industry guideline or best-practice guide.  The distractors are designed to sound plausible to those who lack the knowledge that the question is designed to test. Your best strategy for taking this test is to forget about what *you* would call this wall, but choose the answer that seems to be the "most" correct. 

In this question, you can rule out structural masonry right away because all you can see are stretchers, no headers. While it's conceivable that a structural masonry wall *might* be built like this, it's very unlikely. The second choice, "adhered brick" is a possibility, but it's less likely than the next one, "anchored masonry," which is by far the most likely candidate. 

I have no idea what "supported brick" is supposed to be. I suspect its something that the question writer just made up. 

Bottom line: I think it's a fair question. Someone who really knows brick will have no trouble getting the right answer. Someone who doesn't might not get it. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Jim Katen said:

So, with the NHIE, it helps to keep in mind that every question should have one undeniably correct answer and three distractors. The undeniably correct answer might not be a term or concept that you would use, but it will have at lease one reference source to back it up - that's almost always the building code or an industry guideline or best-practice guide.  The distractors are designed to sound plausible to those who lack the knowledge that the question is designed to test. Your best strategy for taking this test is to forget about what *you* would call this wall, but choose the answer that seems to be the "most" correct. 

In this question, you can rule out structural masonry right away because all you can see are stretchers, no headers. While it's conceivable that a structural masonry wall *might* be built like this, it's very unlikely. The second choice, "adhered brick" is a possibility, but it's less likely than the next one, "anchored masonry," which is by far the most likely candidate. 

I have no idea what "supported brick" is supposed to be. I suspect its something that the question writer just made up. 

Bottom line: I think it's a fair question. Someone who really knows brick will have no trouble getting the right answer. Someone who doesn't might not get it. 

Thanks Jim.  I know NHIE is big on distractors and it never hurts to be reminded of that.  There was a second half of my question.  I know some of the indicators for identifying structural masonry.  With anchored, I would assume you should not be able to physically see any indicators of the anchors themselves.  I did some research on it and watched a few videos on the building process after I got to this question.  Identifying what is NOT there, is something that I need to spend more time on.  I appreciate the difference between the comprehensive NHIE text book versus the AHIT course book.  It makes your thought process become more in depth as opposed to just giving you the answers like AHIT.  

I still cannot knock the AHIT course.  I understand that it doesn't do a great job in preparing you to just hit the road or start getting calls.  It did however, give me a great overview of what I am getting into.  I know exactly what I need to work on and get familiar with (which is a lot).  I know that I will not have a problem passing the IL state exam and that it is just the tip of the iceberg.  I am trying to take all of the info from this site and as many other resources I can get my hands on to complete practice inspections.  I am also gaining confidence in my ability to ask meaningful questions when I find a few ride-alongs.  

   Thanks again.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...