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A 'what is it" question?


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Hello All:

Inspected a pretty cool home today that is right on the shores Lake Erie. Built in 1929 the home is built like a brick s*it house. Great wood work inside, real pleasure to inspect.

In one of the attached pics it shows a cast cover that was located just outside the home. At first I though it was a coal chute but on the cover it said "garbage receiver". My guess it that it was just a hole outside where one might put the trash until disposed of. Anyone ever see this?

There is also a picture of the "Dryolet" A gas-fired clothes dryer. It was made here in Cleveland.

It's nice to inspect a older home that is still in good condition.

Also, forgot to say the the home had a boat house built into the side of the drop off. I would have loved to see it however, the steps going down looked like they were a death trap and seeing as we just had a good gulley washer I wasn't going to try the dirt slope going down.

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I've seen those "garbage receivers" before. If my memory serves me correct, they were larger and installed near the curb. I can't remember where, but I remember whole neighborhoods with them. 2-3 units per house.

As far as the dryolet, It's a drying closet for hanged clothes. Not a bad idea. I've seen newer (flimsey)renditions of that concept for sale at appliance stores. I like it. When I do the wash, I hang much of it on hangers to dry, tumble drying isn't good for things you care about.

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Hi,

There are a lot of those in here in Seattle but they are no longer used. They had an inner pail with a handle. The trash guy came up alongside the house, grabbed the pail, dumped it into a bigger truck and then put the pail back into place under the lid.

The hanging cabinet recently came back out as a combination dryer by Maytag and Kenmore. My wife wants one so she can stop hanging the more vulnerable fabric clothes over the bathtub in the spare bathroom. They dry nice and wrinkle free in those things.

OT - OF!!!

M.

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Originally posted by Steven Hockstein

That is common around here. In some towns the residence pay for private garage disposal. A can sits in the ground and the heavy cover prevents animals from accessing the garbage. Garbage companies actually send someone onto your property to retrieve the garbage. No curbside pickup is required.

The same here. In the city of Portland, they were standard issue. In fact, they're so common, I've never bothered to snap a picture of one.

Never seen a Dryolet though. Seems like a good idea.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Local boys correct me if I'm wrong, but the Boston-area in-ground garbage can 'lids' have the words "F.B. Jones, Somerville,MA" cast into them, no? Just a weird observation from childhood and obs around Boston... Local pig farmers used to pick up the garbage around Boston area. I don't think it is going on anywhere around Boston anymore....probably no more pig farms (Wilmington?). Our 'garbage' guy had an uncovered open truck he dumped it into. Stank badly...

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Many older houses in West Roxbury,Jamaice Plain, Hyde Park and surrounding towns have these still in the ground. Most of my customers have no clue? Half of these houses have renovated(?) Coal bins and shoots. One Realtor showed us a neat wine cellar--yep! converted from a coal bin.

My first job was delivering milk and eggs from a local dairy truck. Little 9 year old scaling the steps with the "order".

Where are the old days gone?[:-banghea

Jack Ahern Needham on the Charles

Bridgton,Maine

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  • 2 years later...
  • 1 year later...

These "Garbage Cans" (mine has "F.B. Jones, Somerville, Mass." stamped on the lid) were intended for food scraps for pigs. Pig farmers collected them every day, or at least every other day, to feed their pigs. Back then (my house in MA was built in 1915), every community had several small, backyard pig farms, so these cans were useful for the householder and the swineherder. We also had them in England, where I grew up.

Does the Jones foundry/business still exist? How far did its products reach - beyond New England?

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ran across this posting searching for the answer to this very question,

we bought a house here in Southern MI. about 3 years ago, and have one of these same covers right next to our drive way,

and was very surprised to finally learn what it was actually for,

boy oh boy, i sure wish i lived way back then,

the olden time sound like they where so cool.

my parents are antique dealers,

and the stories they tell of the years gone by are very intriguing to me.

thanks for revealing the answer for me.

attached is a couple photos of my garbage can lid.

now that i know what it is for, i wish i had the can that went into it.

so it would be more authentic.

i also wish i had a lid that was in much better condition (without rust holes ect...)

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Quote:Originally posted by Steven Hockstein

That is common around here. In some towns the residence pay for private garage disposal. A can sits in the ground and the heavy cover prevents animals from accessing the garbage. Garbage companies actually send someone onto your property to retrieve the garbage. No curbside pickup is required.

id="quoteN">

The same here. In the city of Portland, they were standard issue. In fact, they're so common, I've never bothered to snap a picture of one.

Never seen a Dryolet though. Seems like a good idea.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

I took this picture of a line of them behind an apartment building converted to condos, thinking it might come in handy some day. As Jim said, they're not uncommon around here.

While we're on the subject of garbage, how many of you have seen one of these in an old basement?

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