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Expected Useful Life of Stucco


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I'm writing a physical inspection report of a nursing home in Maryland that was built in 1989 and has a hardcoat stucco finish. It has a couple of minor cracks that can be repaired but no real problems as far as the inspector (who is actually a 65-year-old architect who has seen just about everything) can detect. He told me that this stucco has a 50-year expected useful life; however, the Fannie Mae guidelines do not give an expected useful life other than painting every 5 years.

Just wondering, what kind of experience do you guys have with this? It's pretty unusual for me to deal with stucco so I'm not sure if I should count on replacing it in the next 37 years.

Thanks,

Vanessa

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Around here, we have stucco from the 1920's that's doing just fine.

I'm not sure what you mean by "expected useful life." Trying to predict what a particular stucco installation will be like in 37 years is folly.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Well, this is how we define EUL - if normal workmanship, normal quality of materials, normal maintenance, how long will this item typically last?

Yes, it certainly seems like folly to make predictions as far into the future as 37 years, but that's the requirements for the refinance program.

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Originally posted by mommabear3502

Well, this is how we define EUL - if normal workmanship, normal quality of materials, normal maintenance, how long will this item typically last?

Yes, it certainly seems like folly to make predictions as far into the future as 37 years, but that's the requirements for the refinance program.

In my part of the world Real Estate Appraisers are obligated to include in their report the remaining life expectancy of every home they appraise. The Mortgage Company demands this. As a home inspector I have never been asked to do that. Also in my past life I was a Certified Real Estate Appraiser. (Now inactive).

Paul B.

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Yes, it certainly seems like folly to make predictions as far into the future as 37 years, but that's the requirements for the refinance program.

That does not mean that you have to provide it! It is not possible to predict anything, except the mood of your wife once a month!

Keep in mind that it is your name on that dotted line if it does not hold true. Granted that chances of that happing are few, but you just never know.

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Originally posted by Scottpat

Yes, it certainly seems like folly to make predictions as far into the future as 37 years, but that's the requirements for the refinance program.

That does not mean that you have to provide it! It is not possible to predict anything, except the mood of your wife once a month!

Keep in mind that it is your name on that dotted line if it does not hold true. Granted that chances of that happing are few, but you just never know.

LOL, unfortunately I do have to provide it. It is a requirement of HUD for the MAP program, and it is included in the Scope of Work agreement we have with the client! There are a lot of legal disclaimers in the report absolving us of any responsibility if the components don't last as long as we say they will since I'm not clairvoyant.

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If indeed it is stucco and if indeed it has normal maintenance, and it is a properly applied product; then it would have a life expectancy under normal conditions and exposures of approx 50+-yrs. However, for purposes of a reserve study or actuarially study, it has a longer life.

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I routinely see hardcoat stucco apps which are more than 70 years old. That doesn't mean that the one you looked at will - it's just been my observation and anything less than that old is still doing well, except for the crap jobs and those aren't that hard to spot.

OT - OF!!!

M.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Well sure,

But lets be accurate. It isn't just a stucco problem. That house had composition siding on it - not stucco. Besides, the life of any house can be shortened when they're installed in that fashion. It doesn't have to only be a house clad with stucco.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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