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Are Soffit vents Inlets?


Jeff Remas
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Originally posted by kurt

Originally posted by Steven Hockstein

Hope you also noted that they left out the "H" clips.

Speaking of which, when did H clips become required, i.e., what year?

"H" clips were recommended by the American Plywood Association when I was a field rep in 1968. Required is code question dependent on the AHJ.

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Hi Paul,

Yeah, they are still only 'recommended' by APA's offspring.

Chris,

I feel your pain. OSB is used in about 99.9% of new construction here anymore. I think the only new homes I've seen plywood used on over the past almost-8 years have been custom builts. It holds up reasonably well here for both roof and sidewall applications. How well, really depends on whether the roofer, window installer and siding contractor have done their jobs right or had their heads up their butts.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Your answer can be found in Table R503.2.1.1(1) of the IRC 2000. Depending upon the span rating, panel thickness, and span of trusses or rafters, you can determine if edge support (in the form of blocking or "H clips") is necessary. Again, manufacturer requirements will prevail.

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Down here in the land of high heat and humidity, I've never seen a bath exhaust fan properly vented to the exterior. They all vent into the attic, but are almost never ducted over to the soffit. Normally I see them with a 2 or 3 foot dryer vent hose, nailed to a nearby 2 x 4 to keep it out of the insulation. The humidity in a hot attic in the dead of summer in Mississippi is such that whatever is being exhausted from the bathroom is meaningless...rain falling on the ocean.

I've never seen anything like Jeff's photo, and never expect to. Sure is ugly though.

Brian G.

In the Steamy South [:-crazy]

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Hi,

I see it all the time here in the northwest, although the method that Brian describes was used here right up until about the middle of the 90's when Washington came out with an energy code that required they be ducted to the exterior.

Most winters here are mild and don't make enough difference to make the use of insulation really a super critical thing. However, I write them up on every home, 'cuz in Dec '96/'97 we had lots of snow and New England like weather for about a month. During that time, I found plenty of uninsulated ducts sagging between trusses full of water that had condensed inside of them because they weren't insulated. Some, where the ducts were just 4 inch galvanized steel, were causing water to condense, leak at joints and stain the ceilings below. Since I can't predict when mother nature will take another dump on us like that one, I'm not taking any chances.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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