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Hanging fixture splices


rthitoff
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I do electrical work while I try to get my Inspection business going. I have been using heat shrink tubing to lower hanging fixtures so as not to have to rewire the fixture. It was brought to my attention about splices being in j-boxes. Of course the NEC seems to say different things in different places about flexible cords. Could someone please explain this in lamens terms.

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I use shrink tube quite a bit when soldering connections in low voltage wiring, usually more for cosmetics/neatness and space saving. In the boat, more for protection against corrosion. I'm not sure about the effect of higher voltage on the tube. Could it possibly cause cracking from the higher heat?

My thoughts about splices being in boxes is more that all splices have to be accessable and not buried (even if the splice is in a box). As far as a splice being exposed, now that I think about it, I'm actually not sure. Technically speaking, isn't any plug/outlet a splice?

Now that I think about it, I can recall seeing splices like you mention on swag lights using wire nuts.

I think some additional help is needed for a definitive answer.

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Originally posted by rthitoff

I do electrical work while I try to get my Inspection business going.

Um, are you an electrician?

I have been using heat shrink tubing to lower hanging fixtures so as not to have to rewire the fixture. It was brought to my attention about splices being in j-boxes. Of course the NEC seems to say different things in different places about flexible cords. Could someone please explain this in lamens terms.

Sorry, Rick. I'm not going to be an enabler here. I know it sounds cold, but if you don't understand this stuff, you shouldn't be doing it. Call your local community college or the local IBEW union hall for training. You should be a journeyman electrician or working under a supervisor before doing this kind of work.

If you have home inspection questions, feel free to ask. But please, everyone, no homeowner how-to questions.

- Jim Katen, Oregon, Electrical Forum Moderator

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I do apologize, I am working under a journeyman and master electrician, and I am studying for my residential wiremans license. They just don't answer my questions to my satisfaction. I work for a lighting retailer in the service department on fans and fixtures. I got my Inspectors license in July, and am trying to learn things. I have learned alot about inspecting here.

Thanks Rick

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Originally posted by rthitoff

I do apologize, I am working under a journeyman and master electrician, and I am studying for my residential wiremans license. They just don't answer my questions to my satisfaction. I work for a lighting retailer in the service department on fans and fixtures. I got my Inspectors license in July, and am trying to learn things. I have learned alot about inspecting here.

Thanks Rick

Sorry if I was harsh. I have no tolerance for homeowner how-to questions about electrical stuff.

But seeing as how you're on the job. . .

The requirement for splices being in j-boxes is at 300.15, but it only applies to conduit, tubing and cables, not cords.

400.9 is the article that prohibits splices in cords when they're initially installed. If you need to repair them, then you can splice them in accordance with the guidelines in 110.14(B) *if* the completed splice retains the insulation, outer sheath properties, and usage characteristics of the original cord.

110.14(B) basically says that, if you solder a splice, the splice first has to be electrically and mechanically secure.

Now, in my mind, lengthening a hanging fixture isn't really a "repair." It's closer to a re-installation. I'd push pretty hard for a continuous length of cord in the finished product.

So, what "different things in different places about flexible cords" do you see in the NEC that would make for confusion?

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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OK, I may be reading things wrong, as I will do. NEC 410.28(d)No unnecessary splices or taps shall be made within or on a luminaire(fixture). The other place I saw it was IRC 2003 E3809.3 Flexible cord shall be used in continuous lengths without splices or taps.

I know I said NEC, but doesn't the IRC come from the NEC?

I'll drop it after this.

Thanks for your input

Rick

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Originally posted by rthitoff

OK, I may be reading things wrong, as I will do. NEC 410.28(d)No unnecessary splices or taps shall be made within or on a luminaire(fixture). The other place I saw it was IRC 2003 E3809.3 Flexible cord shall be used in continuous lengths without splices or taps.

Well, that all seems consistent to me. The overall rule is that the cords are continuous but there's a provision for splices *only* in the case of repairs. In general, that's how the NEC works. It takes some getting used to.

I know I said NEC, but doesn't the IRC come from the NEC?

The electrical section of the IRC is taken from NFPA 70A, which is taken from NFPA 70, aka the NEC. They extracted the residential stuff from NFPA 70 to create NFPA 70A. It has it's own definitions and is organized very differently from the parent document. That's why I tend to stay away from the electrical portion of the IRC, the sequence and organization of the information confuses me.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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