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Too Much Corrosion?


randynavarro
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Buster, I really can't tell a lot from the photos, but here in AC land a small amount of rust or corrosion is very normal at the evaporator (end brackets, etc.). I once saw a system that was less than a month old with more than that. I don't understand why they don't use aluminum or some alloy for those parts, unless it's planned obsolecense or cheapo-ism.

Somewhere between 1/2 and 2/3rd's of those I see are also sealed up and inaccessible. I wish they couldn't do that.

Brian G.

Love That AC [:-love]

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Originally posted by randynavarro

Ok, for the guys that see these everyday.

I see five air conditioners a year and usually all five have the front of the evaporator cabinet totally sealed and inaccessible.

Finally got an accessible one today.

Is this 'normal' corrosion on the bottom tray of these coils?

The corrosion on the coil doesn't look unusual. But it shouldn't be spilling onto the lower plenum like that.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Originally posted by Terence McCann

Randy, explain the view on the first picture for me.

Are you looking at a horizontal furnace? Is it a counter-flow (down-flow furnace) designed for a slab home? I'm trying to figure out if the evap coil is installed upside down.

Typically they need to be installed upright as shown in picture.

evapcoil.jpg

Yes, it is a downflow. Here, most are as the supply ducts run through the crawlspace under the home.

Very few slabs here.

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Originally posted by Brian G.

Buster, I really can't tell a lot from the photos, but here in AC land a small amount of rust or corrosion is very normal at the evaporator (end brackets, etc.). I once saw a system that was less than a month old with more than that. I don't understand why they don't use aluminum or some alloy for those parts, unless it's planned obsolecense or cheapo-ism.

Somewhere between 1/2 and 2/3rd's of those I see are also sealed up and inaccessible. I wish they couldn't do that.

Brian G.

Love That AC [:-love]

Thank you kindly Brian. Thats helpful.

But . . . who's Buster?

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Yes, it could be installed upside down. The only way to be 100% sure that it is correct/incorrect is to get model & serial numbers and check with the manufacture. A coils are typically installed in the A fashion, not a V fashion. Did the condensate pan look like it was a factory thing or something that might have been banged out in the field?

Condensation carryover is when the condensate does not drain to the condensate pan correctly and ends up getting in the duct work. This can happen for a few reasons, installing the coil incorrectly is one of them. It can also happen with a high delta P across the coil. In the commercial equipment, where you can change pulleys on the fan and motor, you can actually speed up the fan to a point where it will blow the condensate off the coil (or pull it off if the coil is on the negative side of the fan). This happens more with vertical coils on builtup or package systems. Example might be where an HVAC company speeds up the fan to try to get more air flow and ends up creating this problem.

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