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Exposed Sill Plate


link420
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Live in NJ looking at a potential new home purchase. Should one at any time be able to see an exposed sill plate. House was built in 1962 so I don't see it being pressure treated wood.

You have to duck down to look under an overhang but it is definately exposed to the elements. Foundation is only one foot from the earth and home mostly on a slab.

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It's a strange formation and I do wish I had photos but it's an overhang of about 1 foot in front of it. It's definately a sill plate.

Maybe I should clarify. It may not be exposed to the wind and rain but it would be definately exposed to any backsplash from wet soil being so close to the ground itself and it is definatley exposed to insects.

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Hi,

It sounds like you're looking at a sill beneath a cantilevered bumpout. So the bottom sides of the bumpout don't extend to below the level of that sill - or do they?

Around here, they typically secure cleats to the inside of the bumpout skirt and to the sill and secure a dust cover over the whole thing, However, if the bumpout doesn't have a skirt that extends below that, and there's a cover on the bottom of the bumpout, leaving the sill exposed, you have to ask yourself whether it's harming the house.

That house is 45 years old. Any sign of damage there? If not, I'd say that the overhang has done a pretty good job of protecting it from the elements - especially considering the fact that you're in snow country and it probably has snow against it all winter.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Originally posted by link420

Live in NJ looking at a potential new home purchase. Should one at any time be able to see an exposed sill plate. House was built in 1962 so I don't see it being pressure treated wood.

You have to duck down to look under an overhang but it is definately exposed to the elements. Foundation is only one foot from the earth and home mostly on a slab.

Hire a home inspector. Ask him.

Without a picture, and with only a description from an amateur, there's no way we can give you any meaningful information here.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Well yes, I'm only an amateur and of course, I am going to hire an inspector (which in NJ can only be done after you submit an offer and a deposit) but out of curiosity, I was interested in knowing.

In reading all of the feedback, which I do appreciate by the way, it does sound like a bump-out. Only worries, how long will be in good standing if nothing is done. Obviously, a good inspector will explain how to remediate.

Thanks everyone.

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Well yes, I'm only an amateur and of course, I am going to hire an inspector (which in NJ can only be done after you submit an offer and a deposit) but out of curiosity, I was interested in knowing.

That's what the real estate agents want you to do. Kind of like when the car dealer tells you to drive the car home to see how you like it!

I bet if told them that you wanted to inspect the home before you made the offer, they would let you do it. The agents are the road block.

Anyway if you can't do it prior to making an offer, just be sure that you make your offer contingent on a satisfactory home inspection. And that it must be satisfactory to you.

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