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Titanium underlayment


Chad Fabry
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I'm roofing our home next week(and siding and trimming and everything else)

I'm considering this new underlayment http://interwrap.com/Titanium-UDL/old%2 ... index.html

but I'm concerned because it appears to be vapor impermeable. I was hoping one of you has read read something or heard something about the product.

The other problem I have is the tower on our Italian Villa style home. It makes a funky valley on two sides and is a problem area to seal and drain. Copper is now over 300 bucks a sheet or I'd solder some pans and fix it right. Since that option would cost more than a new car I'm open to other suggestions. I've done nearly every kind of roofing and I can't come up with a decent solution.

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I'm considering this new underlayment http://interwrap.com/Titanium-UDL/old%2 ... index.html

but I'm concerned because it appears to be vapor impermeable. I was hoping one of you has read read something or heard something about the product.

I wouldn't use something other than felt when felt will do. I would only consider that product if:

a) the underlayment was going to be exposed for over a month.

b) it's a really steep roof and I'm too cool to work off of roof jacks.

...a funky valley on two sides and is a problem area to seal and drain. Copper is now over 300 bucks a sheet or I'd solder some pans and fix it right.

I regularly talk people out of using copper, unless it's critical to maintain historic accuracy to replace copper with copper. I would use what was probably used originally - terneplate. It outlasts copper.

www.follansbeeroofing.com/products/TerneII.aspx

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Originally posted by Chad Fabry

I'm roofing my own home next week(and siding and trimming and everything else)

I'm considering this new underlayment http://interwrap.com/Titanium-UDL/old%2 ... index.html

but I'm concerned because it appears to be vapor impermeable. I was hoping one of you has read read something or heard something about the product.

I've never heard of it. As a general rule, new products fail in short order and are never heard from again. Felt works. I'd use it.

The other problem I have is the tower on our Italian Villa style home. It makes a funky valley on two sides and is a problem area to seal and drain. Copper is now over 300 bucks a sheet or I'd solder some pans and fix it right. Since that option would cost more than a new car I'm open to other suggestions. I done nearly every kind of roofing and I can't come up with a decent solution.

I'll second Bill's suggestion of terne.

- Jim Katen

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Terne it is. I have a couple 6lb irons that have been gathering dust since I installed the copper roof over the bay window. BTW, when you raise blueberries it doesn't really matter what materials you use for roofing because the birds paint everything a cerulean hue.

As for the felt...it's always been my first choice as an underlayment. The hired help was hoping I'd use the new product because it's light and easy. I promised I'd look into the merits of his suggestion.

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Originally posted by Chad Fabry

Terne it is. I have a couple 6lb irons that have been gathering dust since I installed the copper roof over the bay window. BTW, when you raise blueberries it doesn't really matter what materials you use for roofing because the birds paint everything a cerulean hue.

As for the felt...it's always been my first choice as an underlayment. The hired help was hoping I'd use the new product because it's light and easy. I promised I'd look into the merits of his suggestion.

Chad,

You might want to check this out

http://www.follansbeeroofing.com/produc ... specs.aspx

Particularly this,

Limitations: All Terne II surfaces must drain and must be painted. Terne II to be applied on a wood deck. Wood treatments that are hygroscopic or chemically treated, such as ACQ (Alkaline Copper Quaternary), must not be used for decking under Terne II. Minimum 1/2" plywood to be specified. If sheathing boards are specified, maximum 2" spacing between boards. Roof deck must be smooth, clean, dry and must remain dry after application. Rosin sized paper is the only permissible underlay on a Terne II application. Do not apply roofing felts under Terne II.

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Just did the research.

500 a square for the Stainless steel variety. That's just under the 600 a square for copper. Both numbers gave me a distinctive facial twitch.

I'm going with The "Terne" II product which is carbon steel coated w/ zinc and tin. This product must be painted. I can live with the fact that it'll wear out sometime in the early 22nd century. Two rolls 24 inches by 50 feet are 328.00 plus freight. Another hundred for pure tin solder and rosin flux.

I know Walter has installed this stuff because I read an article in JLC that he wrote. I'm sure he'll add something to my description.

Pans have to be made, in this case no larger than 20x28 inches. Pan size is limited because the fasteners are in the seams and big pans means there can't be enough fasteners and also to prevent "oil canning". The term refers to the old time oil cans that you pushed the convex bottom into a concave shape to pump the oil. That process made a noise. If large pans are used the expansion and contraction resulting from temperature changes causes the roof to "pop".

The pans are formed by first cutting off the corners, then on two adjacent sides a lip is bent over to about 45 degrees..then the pan is turned over and the other two adjacent sides are formed the same way. The lips will lock into each other and are then hammered tight, fluxed and soldered.

The pans are attached to the deck with cleats made of the sheet material and sround 2 inches by 4 inches. The cleats are nailed to the roof and folded into the pan seams. This attachment method allows some movement of the roof as heat expands the material.

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