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I recently ran into an installation where in the service panel the breaker for the Oven was labeled and appeared to be compliant. After further evaluation I observed there was not a breaker for the Dryer. After evaluating the laundry area I observed the dryer was electrical which required a 30-amp breaker. The only breaker in the panel with 30-amp capacity was for the oven. By luck I happen to trip the 30-amp for the oven and to my surprise the dryer did not function. My question is does the Dryer and Oven have a requirement to be on separate breakers?

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Originally posted by Katanadave27

I recently ran into an installation where in the service panel the breaker for the Oven was labeled and appeared to be compliant. After further evaluation I observed there was not a breaker for the Dryer. After evaluating the laundry area I observed the dryer was electrical which required a 30-amp breaker. The only breaker in the panel with 30-amp capacity was for the oven. By luck I happen to trip the 30-amp for the oven and to my surprise the dryer did not function. My question is does the Dryer and Oven have a requirement to be on separate breakers?

Yes.

Sorry to be so brief in my first reply. I'll elaborate:

The issue isn't so much that you need separate breakers. (There are tap rules and other allowances for a breaker to protect more than just a single range or dryer.) The real issue is that you've got two appliance loads that exceed the rating of the branch circuit. This isn't allowed per 220.18.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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I agree but to be brief I found out there can be exceptions.

My last job had a electric base board and an AC both on a thirty with my understanding this was ok since they would not normaly be used at the same time.

Worst that can happen would be a tripped breaker .

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My opinion which is usually supplemented by the panel of experts is you can look on the appliances and see what they are pulling.

If both these units are electric I know they for sure need separate runs with their own 30 amp breakers .I say 30 as this is what seems to be common for these kind of units.Of course the wire gauge should also meet at least minimum.This is a common sense type issue.The one double breaker is not rated for that much draw.

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Originally posted by Katanadave27

Bob and Jim,

Thanks for your help. Is there any documentation such as NEC or IRC that I can use to back up my claim or just use the specfic manufacturer's requirment (if available) of a separate breaker.

NEC 220.18 Maximum Loads. The total load shall not exceed the rating of the branch circuit. . .

IRC E3601.2 Branch-circuit and feeder ampacity. Branch-circuit and feeder conductors shall have ampacities not less than the maximum load to be served. . .

There are probably other cites that apply, but those ought to do it.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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