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Small Appliance Code Confusion


snydl0ga
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I was looking at the different codes for recptacles and I may be confusing that with "outlets" but here is my question.

In one paragraph I read that a kitchen must have at least two 20 amp small appliance circuits and that they can also supply the receptacles in the dinning room.

Then I read another paragraph that states these two small appliances branches can not supply other outlets.

Help me out...can I supply receptacles in other rooms from these?

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Lance...

The "no other outlets" refers to lighting etc, as Mike pointed out. "Outlets" are undefined power taps while "receptacles" or "receptacle outlet" refers to the "thingies you stick a plug in" (technical term).

So yes, you can feed the receptacles (and an electric clock) in a dining room from the kitchen small appliance circuit. If one of those receptacles then fed an exterior GFCI receptacle it would be wrong as that "space" isn't listed in 210.52(B)(1).

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And technically, the kitchen GFCI protected receptacles in the breakfast area, etc. should be labeled "GFCI Protected Outlet". Most around here are not labeled and I write up the lack of labeling. I think the homeowner needs to know.

I've gotten into the habit of testing those breakfast or dining area receptacles for GFCI protection in newer construction just to see if the eletrician wired them on the small appliance circuit.

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Originally posted by mcramer

Originally posted by Paul MacLean

And technically, the kitchen GFCI protected receptacles in the breakfast area, etc. should be labeled "GFCI Protected Outlet".

Where does it say that in the NEC?

(Hint: It doesn't)

So Mark, I guess you're saying labeling GFCIs is not a good idea?

Unfortunately I can't find my source for the labeling of GFCIs (I didn't say it was the NEC), but labeling is consistently done in new construction here. The "GFCI Protected Outlet" label can sure help avoid a lot of confusion and I will continue to recommend it where appropriate.

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Paul,

I don't think Mark said it wasn't a good idea. I believe he said it wasn't required by the NEC. If you read the NEC I think you will find many things which would be a "good idea" which aren't required. Unfortunately the code making panels are, for the most part, far behind the times. Prime example: GFCI protection is not required in a laundry room with a slop sink even if it has a countertop. I defy you to explain the difference between the above location and a kitchen sink or a wet bar sink in terms of the consequences encountered when using all of the above.

NORM SAGE

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