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My first real appointment is booked. It looks pretty straight forward. A good starting point. Brick town home built in 1953. I searched the address and came up with a preview linked below. Appears to be an easy job.

Have a look at the link and tell me if you think there are things I should keep in mind with a property of this type and era. I see the glass block windows in the basement which could be an egress problem depending on how the basement will be used. What do you see? Anything of interest?

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I hope this helps but I suggest you bring a cheat sheet as you will be a little nervous and may forget to check something.

Do yourself a favour by taking lots of pictures when you need to see what you forgot to note.

A picture under the sinks is a must ,as is the open electrical panel.

Here ,if you think it is easy ,answer this off the top of your head.

Will it be a main or a remote distrubution panel inside a town house?

Last tip is make an excuse for going back to the vehicle and think for a minute.

This is where you can collect thoughts on what you need to look at.

Good Luck

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The listing reads:

BEAUTIFULLY RENOVATED HOME, UPGRADED FEATURES INCLUDE, NEW FURN & C/A, BOTH BATHROOMS TOTALY NEW, HOT WATER HEATER NEW, WALL TO WALL NEW. WONDERFULLY DESIGNED KITCHEN WITH MILLS PRIDE CABINETS. TILT-OUT REPLACEMENT WINDOWS, ALL 3 DOORS DOORS REPLACED. THIS PROPERTY IS A PLACE TO CALL HOME AND READY FOR IMMEDIATE POSSESSION.

Code for this property is being flipped.

Look for old electrical. Look for water supply problems. Chances are that neither have been completely updated.

Best advice is to arrive early, say about 30 minutes. This will allow you to look at the exterior and to calm down before you start the show. Next piece of advice is to say " I do not know, but I will find out and let you know", if you are asked a question that you do not have a clue about. Do not make anything up, they will appreciate you telling them that you will look it up and get back with them.

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Originally posted by Scottpat

The listing reads:

BEAUTIFULLY RENOVATED HOME, UPGRADED FEATURES INCLUDE, NEW FURN & C/A, BOTH BATHROOMS TOTALY NEW, HOT WATER HEATER NEW, WALL TO WALL NEW. WONDERFULLY DESIGNED KITCHEN WITH MILLS PRIDE CABINETS. TILT-OUT REPLACEMENT WINDOWS, ALL 3 DOORS DOORS REPLACED. THIS PROPERTY IS A PLACE TO CALL HOME AND READY FOR IMMEDIATE POSSESSION.

Code for this property is being flipped.

Look for old electrical. Look for water supply problems. Chances are that neither have been completely updated.

Best advice is to arrive early, say about 30 minutes. This will allow you to look at the exterior and to calm down before you start the show. Next piece of advice is to say " I do not know, but I will find out and let you know", if you are asked a question that you do not have a clue about. Do not make anything up, they will appreciate you telling them that you will look it up and get back with them.

A flip is a sleeper. Many problems are masked. Fresh paint and all. Hunt for problems that are characteristic to the age and region. Sorry but MD is way different than my area so I can be of no help there. Go slow and look carefully.

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Is the roof part of the inspection, i.e. is the owner responsible for the roof or is the association. Will you inspect even if the association is responsible as this can be a big assessment.

Look close in the attic for this as evidence of ice damming.

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See the black & white at the bottom of the sheathing.

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Check for water damage beneath that front door. If the basement's finished, press with your foot along the threshold in the entry hall. Also, make certain the firewalls are intact between your unit and its neighbors.

Check that they replaced the coil along with the furnace and C/A--I mean, A/C. If the evaporator coil isn't 13 SEER, it's wrong.

If the place is a flip, as others have suggested, try to find out if they finished the basement. If they did, the wiring likely had to be inspected by a governmental entity before the drywall went up. Look for a sticker in the panel that says, "Basement remodel," or something similar.

I don't see an air-gap on the kitchen sink, but the photo's small so maybe I'm missing it.

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Ok looking at the picture I am wondering about the gutters.

Is that two of them side by side.

Make sure they go the six feet and look for signs of flooding in the basement.

Normally I would look inside the furnace housing for a water line but it is new.

Most likely new drywall down there .

So signs may be found in the back utility room where there is most likely a washer dryer .The glass blocks look newer.After looking at the kitchen I am sure you will find galvanized pipe and need to check for low pressure .

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The previous responses all contain good info. I believe the most important advice is the admonition to look closely at things if this is indeed a flip. I have done a bunch of those locally. Almost without exception, they do a lot of cosmetic work and the mechanicals are an absolute train wreck. After all, buyers fall in love with the sizzle of a property, not the (unknown to them) condition of the plumbing, wiring and HVAC systems.

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Yeah.. the Agents name is Bubba.

Galvanized steel pipes in a house are typically 1/2 inch inside diameter. The connections are threaded. When the pipe wears out, the rust accumulation inside the pipe chokes down the diameter of the pipe, resulting in poor water pressure. Eventually, the pipe will rust through, usually at the joints first, resulting in leakage.

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Originally posted by Chris Bernhardt

I ditto the cheat sheet. I still to this day run down the SOP during and at the end of the inspection to make sure I have covered everything.

Chris, Oregon

Actually, several weeks ago I set up my report software template to not only include all of the NAHI SOP but also exceed them in a few areas. As I navigate through the screens on the PDA it will force me to address everything. If I miss something the software will flag the category as "incomplete". I guess you could say it has a built in cheat sheet.

Thanks for all of the tips. As others have stated, my nerves will be one of my bigger challenges. I trust they will calm down as I get rolling. I have done two of the consultation jobs. The second one was much more relaxed than the first so I know the feeling in general.

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Originally posted by AHI

My first real appointment is booked. It looks pretty straight forward. A good starting point. Brick town home built in 1953. I searched the address and came up with a preview linked below. Appears to be an easy job.

Have a look at the link and tell me if you think there are things I should keep in mind with a property of this type and era. I see the glass block windows in the basement which could be an egress problem depending on how the basement will be used. What do you see? Anything of interest?

http://www.coldwellbanker.com/servlet/P ... e=property

I think you will do just fine. Lot's of good advise already, but I would not go into the inspection with the mindset that it's going to be an easy inspection based on the photos provided.

Every home is different!

And remember that YOU are the professional home inspector! Everyone that is present at the inspection will be looking to you for the answers, so keep things in perspective and keep in the back of your mind that you know more than they do about inspecting homes.

Congrats on the job, and good luck :)

Kevin

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That was direct off the Carson Dunlop site.

When a shower does not hit the end of the tub but sprays down like a guy needing Viagra everyone refers to that as weak pressure though it may be you are technically correct.

Same reason I do not stick to 55 mph when everyone else is going 70mph.

I go with the flow

Of course I still call copy machines Xerox's

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Galvanized pipe was commonly used for water supply lines many years ago, but over time many have filled with scale, which is why some older homes suffer from low water pressure. Hard water greatly reduces the life of steel pipe.http://www.keidel.com/mech/pvf/pipe-galvanized.htm

I can find and link sites from suppliers and plumbers that use the same term though yes there is satisfaction in knowing you are correct.Technically

and I agree, but at the same time feel ok with that term.

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I understand that volume capability is the more important factor for the home owner. Pressure plays a role in there too. For instance, if there is an obstruction in a supply line up stream it will effect the volume capability.

Lets say you have one faucet running and the pressure is x. When you open another faucet at the same time, the pressure in the line will drop, especially if there is an obstruction up stream of the faucets that will effect volume delivery. On the other hand the pressure up stream of the obstruction wont change as much if any at all.

Pressure and volume do relate to one another, more so in some circumstances than in others as well as depending on where, when and how you take your measurements. Having said that, it is lack of volume that will get the attention of the home owner much quicker.

Does that make sense?

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