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StevenT
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The outlet is very close. About 3' rise and 3' out. All stainless steel. I do notice the pitch of the pipe coming out ofthe boiler to be a wee bit negetive. I'm wondering if condensation has been a problem.

Now that I think about it, the outer pipe is not cut or capped. Perhaps rainwater is/was a problem?

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Neal, I agree. I was just wondering if there may have been a legitimate reason to install this ... plug???

As I stated, I recall a drainable "t" fitting that allowed condensation to drain. But the horizontal run was much greater than this one. I thought there was a possibility that this could be an "acceptable field fix" and not a "bogus band-aid."

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The expansion tank is mounted in a clever fashion. Is this a stress test for soldered joints?

The install is sloppy. Maybe the surgeon who worked magic on Brad's plumbing did this by-pass as well. ( Brad, I'm just now recovering from viewing your photos)

Nice flashing on the exterior penetration.

I can't get the theme from "Deliverance" to stop coursing through my thoughts.

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Even though it is not a condensing boiler it does have a propensity to produce condensate in the exhaust stream and a provision to drain it before it runs down and rots the heat exhanger is required by many manufacturers. What you have is a Jackasses version of the listed fitting that should be there. It has to be a horizontal drain T, the whole section of pipe is shaped to catch condensate running back in the pipe.

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This is what should be there.

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However I would not recommend following the example of this particular jackass in the way he decided to drain the condensate.

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Oddly enough the city inspector did not see anything wrong with connecting a source of methane gas (the sewer drain line on the right) to the combustion chamber of this boiler...

(we had a few words over this one)

Just two weeks ago I was on a site monitoring the install of 3 similar boilers in a multifamily. Really long exhaust runs, no drain T. I mentioned it to the plumber who responded "this is not a condensing boiler, we do all of them like this" I asked him, if there is no issue with condensate, then why is the vent required to be Stainless Steel... He got a blank look on his face, then I showed him the page in the manual. He wasn't happy.

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Thank you very much Kyle,

I hope you do not mind if I include your picture in my report. Are you telling me that in the boiler installation above, the condensate drain line it draining into a a gas line??? I realize that sometimes people do things wrong, but I just don't see why anyone would even consider doing that?

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Steven,

Help yourself to the picture. If you want a generic version you can look up "z-vent" one of the manufacturers of this type of vent pipe.

http://www.novaflex.com/productcart/pc/ ... roduct=418

The one I posted was not vented to a gas line per-say but to a plumbing waste drain pipe (source of Sewer gas which of course contains a fair percentage of methane gas) The drain line needs to have a trap on it to act as a seal. I'd imagine the one you pictured must have been venting exhaust gases through that nipple without a traped drain on it. Also, note in the manufacturers manual that I posted the drain is required to be a high temp Silicone tubing for the first 18 inches (not the clear, flamable vinyl my jackass friend used)

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Steven,

Help yourself to the picture. If you want a generic version you can look up "z-vent" one of the manufacturers of this type of vent pipe.

http://www.novaflex.com/productcart/pc/ ... roduct=418

The one I posted was not vented to a gas line per-say but to a plumbing waste drain pipe (source of Sewer gas which of course contains a fair percentage of methane gas) The drain line needs to have a trap on it to act as a seal. I'd imagine the one you pictured must have been venting exhaust gases through that nipple without a traped drain on it. Also, note in the manufacturers manual that I posted the drain is required to be a high temp Silicone tubing for the first 18 inches (not the clear, flamable vinyl my jackass friend used)

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Originally posted by randynavarro

Originally posted by StevenT

. . . Are you telling me that in the boiler installation above, the condensate drain line it draining into a a gas line???

No. The explosive part of poo and sewage is methane.

(Wonder if the methane actually comes from the pee or the poo?)

I can neither confirm nor deny but I have heard that you can light a fart on fire.

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