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General Home Inspection Training


tommy453
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I really dont know if this is the place to ask this general question, but is there anyone that can give me the lowdown on all these Home Inspection training programs. I am thinking of starting training for this fine industry. I have been a wallpaper and wall vinyl installer for many years and would really love to be able to correspond with some Home Inspectors to really get a feel for this business, any helpful suggestions would be appreciated. I am a little leary about some of these schools and how quickly you can complete their programs. If this is not the place for this type of inquiry please forgive me and direct me to where I might get some helpful advice. Thanks for any help.

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Hi Tommy,

That subject is discussed here a lot, so the very first thing you should do is go into the archives on this site and read all of the old threads related to schools and training and getting into the business and you'll find out everything you need to know about the business as well as read opinions by others about the various training that's available.

This sounds like a lot of work, but it will be faster than waiting for folks to return from a day's work or to get done writing their reports in the evening and still having the energy to come on here and go into a long dissertation about what works and what doesn't. It's all right here on TIJ and every question that you could possibly think to ask has been asked before. Just start reading.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Originally posted by hausdok

Hi Tommy,

That subject is discussed here a lot, so the very first thing you should do is go into the archives on this site and read all of the old threads related to schools and training and getting into the business and you'll find out everything you need to know about the business as well as read opinions by others about the various training that's available.

This sounds like a lot of work, but it will be faster than waiting for folks to return from a day's work or to get done writing their reports in the evening and still having the energy to come on here and go into a long dissertation about what works and what doesn't. It's all right here on TIJ and every question that you could possibly think to ask has been asked before. Just start reading.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Hi,

It depends on your market, your skills, your personality, and what kind of report you are generating.

I began in mid-april of 1996 and by the end of that year had done 127. I know of other inspectors who're just as competent as I am who've been in the business for more than two years and have only had the opportunity to do about 50. There's really no way to predict it; you just have to get out there in the market, get your face known, get your cards out, and hope you can get some work in time to help you survive through the first couple of years. If you can make it beyond two years, you'll probably still be here 10 years from now.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT !!!

Mike

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Originally posted by tommy453

Thanks guys all points well taken. I am new to this forum stuff. one quick question, How much work can a novice inspector expect to get in the very beginning?

When are you beginning? Point being, real estate sales & inspections are basically in a free fall right now. Business is scarce for everyone, and anyone just starting out isn't going to get much of a slice.

Hard facts. Don't mean to be negative, but that's reality right now.

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Look into US Inspect or InspectTech. They are multi-inspector firms. Who knows, they might be hiring. Both do in-house training, have enough assets to wait this mess out, and they have employee benefits up the yazoo.

Then again, they're hiring carpenters and mechanics in Iraq at min. $86k a year. Might be the place to wait this slump out. 12 hours a day, 6 days of the week, three 10-day vacations a year, free room board, uniforms, laundry, etc.., first $84K tax free. I'm seriously considering it - especially if this slide continues. My little brother is over there now - he says they had lobster at dinner three times last week. However, there is that peculiar weather - the occasional very small and localized hailstorm that likes to blow up and hurt everything within a 15 meter radius. You have to have a certain kind of mindset to ignore the weather conditions.

OT - OF!!!

M.

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Wrong, most suggest against taking the 10 day course and thats it! I took the AHIT course here in VB and it was awesome STARTER material. Can you do home inspections after this course? Sure. Can you do them right, probably not. You must realize that this course puts in 10 days what the old timers had to learn in 10-20 years. It's just not possible. I have put in almost 6 months of more self study, mentoring and ride alongs after class to just get to noob status. Also, if you want to be an HI, realize it will take some cash outlay, it is not as easy as they like to make it sound. I would estimate I spent 10k on starting my business here. Of course you don't have to do it like me and you can save some money but it will take some none the less. AHIT will try and sell you TON's of stuff. Tools, software, marketing material and more. Unless you intend to open your doors the day after class, I don't think any of it is needed. Also, a lot of those items may be found at better prices elsewhere or the material might now be the best fit for you. For example the reporting system they use, it's OK, but that isn't how everyone does it. There may be a better method for you out there besides AHIT's.

Remember, anything worth doing is worth doing right. Also, people that try and sell you things, they usually tell you the best possible cases and others like to state the worst possible cases. You need to find out what is your case and go from there. Call me tomorrow and we'll have lunch and I can tell you how it went, and how is going for me here and maybe what you might expect.

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As for the market here, we are in a lot better shape than most areas. The entire area, VB, Norfolk, Chesapeake, Suffolk, Portsmouth, Hampton etc were severely undervalued when the boom began. Most of the price increases didn't over inflate the values, instead they brought them into par. There has since been a small drop off but nothing like I see in other areas. Will it be easy, nope, but starting a business never is.

BTW, are you thinking of working for an established company or for yourself.

Also, you need to check out the below link. It is to the Alpha College of Real Estate. They have started offering HI classes on the different subjects. Kenny Hart, a long time area inspector and good guy is the instructor there. Not real expensive and a great supplement to the knowledge base.

http://alphacollegeofrealestate.com/05b ... ilding.php

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Hey John, Yeah I am thinking about the AHIT at Norfolk State. I will call when I can get free, hopefully this weekend. from what I am reading and hearing it is probably better to work for someone else. My situation is that I don't have to start earning immediately, I have a window or buffer where I can give my self adequate time to learn the business ins and outs. Did you intern for a established HI? I will check out Alpha.

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Read a bit and you find:

Neutron Staffing is looking for people who want to become a home inspector. Our schools offer comprehensive courses, taught by experienced ASHI®, NAHI and CREIA members, that make students proficient in home inspecting and the business and marketing skills to develop your own home inspection company.

Just another quick buck school!

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I say: It is possible -- although not necessarily easy -- for a bright individual to just start reading, and learn all he needs to know about HI work. If that bright individual is also responsible and personable, he'll get work. I think going to HI school is a giant step backward. HI school is a Bizarro world filled with open ignorance and suburban myths.

Go to a bookstore, buy books that will teach you what you need to know, and study those books. It'll cost a fraction of what HI school costs, you'll know more, and you'll be able to dodge the rain of bullshift that comes from HI schools.

I'm not cynical. Really.

WJ

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Originally posted by SonOfSwamp

I say: It is possible -- although not necessarily easy -- for a bright individual to just start reading, and learn all he needs to know about HI work. If that bright individual is also responsible and personable, he'll get work. I think going to HI school is a giant step backward. HI school is a Bizarro world filled with open ignorance and suburban myths.

Go to a bookstore, buy books that will teach you what you need to know, and study those books. It'll cost a fraction of what HI school costs, you'll know more, and you'll be able to dodge the rain of bullshift that comes from HI schools.

I'm not cynical. Really.

WJ

But don't you have to have something to say that you actually went through some kind of a training program. I would think these schools would at least help you because you could put their logo on your card.
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I simply cannot agree that all HI schools are worthless, or worse. Many may be, or even most, but not all. I learned a great deal from my one week, none of which has since been refuted by any other source I've encountered. One of the most vital things I learned was how much I didn't already know (contrary to what I thought before I got there).

Like so many other opportunities, what you make of it is almost as important as what you're given to work with in the first place. I turned off my cell phone (all day, every day in class); I went back to my room and studied every night; I asked questions and engaged in discussions; I listened. Sadly, very few others in the class were doing likewise, and I expect that not more than one or two others of that group are still in the business. I've survived for more than six years in a small market full of hostile realtors, and I still give part of the credit to that one good week of professional training.

One or two weeks is certainly not enough to turn a clueless Joe into a competent home inspector, but it beats nothing if the school has good instructors and the students are serious. A lot of places still require nothing. It's miles and miles from perfect, I don't dispute that, but I'll bet there are plenty of other good HI's making it out there that don't have anything bad to say about the training they took to get started.

What it should be....hell, I don't know. I'd like to see the profession raised, but I don't want to see the bar set so high that a guy like me has no shot at it anymore because it costs a fortune up-front. If I'd already had a fortune, I wouldn't be crawling under houses and fencing with crooked realtors.

Brian G.

ITA Tampa [^]

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Originally posted by tommy453

But don't you have to have something to say that you actually went through some kind of a training program.

No. You don't.

I would think these schools would at least help you because you could put their logo on your card.

I suspect that doesn't mean a whole lot to anyone other than the guy who owns the card.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Originally posted by Brian G

[navy]I simply cannot agree that all HI schools are worthless, or worse. Many may be, or even most, but not all. I learned a great deal from my one week, none of which has since been refuted by any other source I've encountered. One of the most vital things I learned was how much I didn't already know (contrary to what I thought before I got there).

Yeah, but you attended ITA back when they had top-notch instructors like Cramer teaching there. Everything I've seen and heard tells me that ITA's gig has descended into the toilet since then.

My impression is that they now have instructors who are mostly teaching from a text that they don't truly understand and that they push the students to buy ITA forms and tools.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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