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Seller had indicated to the buyers that two windows seals were not functioning properly any longer. There was no moisture present between the panes, just these weird purple-ish spots all over. It looked to me like when my cheap window tinting job started going bad... Any ideas that this is or if it could be caused by the seals being bad?

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Originally posted by jodil

Seller had indicated to the buyers that two windows seals were not functioning properly any longer. There was no moisture present between the panes, just these weird purple-ish spots all over. It looked to me like when my cheap window tinting job started going bad... Any ideas that this is or if it could be caused by the seals being bad?

That's a sign of failed seals. I believe what you are seeing is the low-e coating actually corroding.

The low-e coating is a molecules-thick layer of metal on one surface of one of the pieces of glass. Sometimes, when the seals fail and moisture enters between the panes, this layer of metal corrodes. I can look purple, gold or iridescent.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Every one is right about the seal failure, but...

Those spots indicate a soft coat low e, and if it is not replaced with glass from the same manufacturer your client will see a difference in the color of the glass which can sometimes be very significant. If the windows are vinyl they very likely have a "lifetime warranty" and the seller should be made to replace them, or provide the warranty info to your client at the very least. Wood windows typically carry a "10/20 warranty", 10 years on the window and 20 on the glass (often prorated after 10). Soft coat technology became very widely used about 10 years ago, so warranty may not fully apply if they are wood.

High performance glass is not exorbitantly expensive, but it ain't cheap either, and since there are so many different varieties, I would strongly advise having the seller involved in the replacement process.

Tom

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Originally posted by Tom Raymond

Every one is right about the seal failure, but...

Those spots indicate a soft coat low e, and if it is not replaced with glass from the same manufacturer your client will see a difference in the color of the glass which can sometimes be very significant. If the windows are vinyl they very likely have a "lifetime warranty" and the seller should be made to replace them, or provide the warranty info to your client at the very least. Wood windows typically carry a "10/20 warranty", 10 years on the window and 20 on the glass (often prorated after 10). Soft coat technology became very widely used about 10 years ago, so warranty may not fully apply if they are wood.

High performance glass is not exorbitantly expensive, but it ain't cheap either, and since there are so many different varieties, I would strongly advise having the seller involved in the replacement process.

Tom

I agree, but for a different reason. Around here, vinyl window manufacturers give a lifetime warranty to the original purchaser only. If the original purchaser sells the home, the manufacturer warrants the window for the first 5 years after the windows were installed. So if you were the original purchaser, and you sold the house 5 years after the windows had been installed, there would be no warranty.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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