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Hardwood floors on a slab.


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If it's a floating slab and they didn't leave enough room at the perimeter to allow for expansion the sides will butt against the base of the wall and raise the center. Remove the baseboards and trim the edges to allow more room. It should lie flat.

OT - OF!!!

M.

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Originally posted by hausdok

If it's a floating slab and they didn't leave enough room at the perimeter to allow for expansion the sides will butt against the base of the wall and raise the center. Remove the baseboards and trim the edges to allow more room. It should lie flat.

OT - OF!!!

M.

I'm not absolutely sure but the only area in the south where a floating slab is used is in FL. Monolithic slabs down here.

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Originally posted by charlieb

Down south when we talk about hardwood on concrete it's an prefinished engineered wood floor. "A spot" is also a clue. It's not hard to tell wood from POS paper floating floors.

Pump the goo

Except there are also engineered wood floors that are the floating type and aren't paper. It's been a while, but I think Bruce is one brand.

OT - OF!!!

M.

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I have glue down Bruce wood floors in my home. I also have the infamous "Pop" in one spot. This is the result of the slab not be level and not being prepped properly by the floor installer before the wood floor was installed. The slab has a small dip and does not allow the glue to adhere properly to the wood plank in this location. So as you walk across it and push it down it sticks for a moment to the glue and then pops back up.

Floating floors do not use glue and will "bow" if they have not been given room for expansion along the edges. Pergo is a big name in floating floors.

Glue down engineered wood floors are the most common on slab construction and if they are done properly they are just fine and look just like a "real" nail down wood floor.

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Originally posted by Scottpat

I have glue down Bruce wood floors in my home. I also have the infamous "Pop" in one spot. This is the result of the slab not be level and not being prepped properly by the floor installer before the wood floor was installed. The slab has a small dip and does not allow the glue to adhere properly to the wood plank in this location. So as you walk across it and push it down it sticks for a moment to the glue and then pops back up.

Floating floors do not use glue and will "bow" if they have not been given room for expansion along the edges. Pergo is a big name in floating floors.

Glue down engineered wood floors are the most common on slab construction and if they are done properly they are just fine and look just like a "real" nail down wood floor.

The goo also acts as a void filler and adhesive. Large spots require more than one hole to be drilled. The extra hole will act as a vent. Small dowels are driven into the holes and set. Top it off with a color match putty and call it done.

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  • 1 year later...

What would be considered to be a normal amount of "hollow" spots under a glue down wood floor application? The floors were leveled with "patch", the floor product was acclimated to the environment for three days prior to install, BST was the glue used. 1500 s/f were installed. There is no movement anywhere in the floor, but hollow spots can be heard near the walls in about 25 locations, if you tap on them or bounce a ball.

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