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I assume this is the main disconnect, but wants yalls confirmations.. Its a Wadsworth 200 amp..What do I call this setup (What do you call those big fuses)

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2008619142346_IMG_1630.jpg

61.14 KB? There were 6 subpanels downstream newly installed and nicely done.

Thanks

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I know they are fuses... I was wondering if there is a specific name for this style of fuse. It is in the basement and the meter in on the main floor. So 70 feet? There was a meter about a foot away but it has been removed. Obviously I should have worded my question differently. This is in a 3 story building (7700 sq ft total) one subpanel in basement next the box pictured, two subs on main floor and three subs on 2nd floor. Is there any problem for a resident on the second story to have to access the main if need be all the way in the basement of this building?

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Cartridge fuse is the correct generic term for that style, but that covers all of the many sizes. There isn't a particular name based on size.

FYI, those are dual-element fuses, AKA "slow-blow" fuses, as opposed to the old standard single element fuses. I could swear the one on the left is a renewable fuse (screw off the end caps and replace the element rather than replace the whole fuse).

It sure looks like a service disconnect, but one really has to determine that onsite.

You say there are six sub panels downstream of this? Those wires leaving the disconnect don't look large enough to carry two or three sub panels, much less six....but there again, it depends on the particulars.

Brian G.

The Devil is in the Details [:-devil]

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I found a similar disconnect in a garage the other day. It had a ground wire attached to a grounding stake. The main distribution panel was in the basement. The distribution panel was wired with neutrals and grounds on the same bus bars. I stated that the distribution panel should have grounds and neutrals separated as it was basically a sub panel, as it was "downstream" from the main disconnect. Was my thinking correct?

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Originally posted by el gato

I found a similar disconnect in a garage the other day. It had a ground wire attached to a grounding stake. The main distribution panel was in the basement. The distribution panel was wired with neutrals and grounds on the same bus bars. I stated that the distribution panel should have grounds and neutrals separated as it was basically a sub panel, as it was "downstream" from the main disconnect. Was my thinking correct?

Yes. The system must have the grounded conductors ("neutrals") and the equipment grounding conductors ("grounds") bonded together inside the enclosure that has the service ("main") disconnect. They need to be kept separated everywhere else downstream.

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Yes. The system must have the grounded conductors ("neutrals") and the equipment grounding conductors ("grounds") bonded together inside the enclosure that has the service ("main") disconnect. They need to be kept separated everywhere else downstream.

Exactly, but if I had a nickel for every subpanel that I find that is wired improperly (bonded neutrals and grounds), I'd be a rich man.

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