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Jumper Wire


caryseidner
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For what it's worth (almost nothing) my guess would be no. But that's only a guess. Around here, not having the same conditions ya'll have in the frozen north where it actually freezes more than a very few inches below grade, we put water meters where they belong: in the ground.[;)] I've never seen or heard of a yoke like that. But if it is all covered in paint as I suspect, I would doubt that it would serve properly as a bonding jumper -- and I doubt it's rated as such.

But that's only a guess. If I'm wrong, I'm sure others will chime in.

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No because it is painted (poor or no connection) and looks to be a slip on device (not a tight clamped on connection to pipe).

Good electrical connections are tight, as with a regular water pipe ground clamp. Some electrical connections, like with the main service panel (big) wires, even require that they be torqued with a torque wrench to a specific tightness (in foot pounds).

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Originally posted by caryseidner

I don't know anything about them myself, and this was the first time I have come across one. I had a commercial inspection in Indiana yesterday and there it was.

I guess I will call McDonald in the morning and ask them what the heck it's for.

Other than mud, I never see anything on a water meter. I seldom ID the main line material.

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I'm going to step right up and show my ignorance. Since all our water meters are underground near the street, I never see anything on them. If you don't count dirt (Like Charlie said) or crickets and spiders. Sometimes the occasional toad. Certainly no wires or yokes.

So here's my question: If the water meter has a nice bronze housing (as shown) and is solidly connected to the water line at both ends, don't you already have a good electro-mechanical connection? Would you ever need a jumper wire in a case like this? Where's the break in continuity that you are trying to bridge over?

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Originally posted by StevenT

The jumper across the meter, like in illustration B, is there in to ensure continuity the event that the meter is removed, and in A, it is there so there is continuity across a non conductive material. At a water heater, it is there in the event the heater is removed.

Around here, most water heaters have steel tanks and many water supply plumbing systems are copper. The water heaters are connected to the water supply system with galvanized steel nipples. In order to prevent galvanic corrosion, there is, or should be, a dielectric between the steel and the copper. The hot and cold copper supply lines (should) have a jumper across them near the water heater to maintain continuity under normal conditions, as well as when the heater is removed during servicing of it.

In my report, I don't dwell on the specific reasons (dielectric, plastic parts inside, removal from service) and all the possibilities for why the jumper may be needed at a particular location. I focus on the purpose of the jumper (to provide electrical continuity of the plumbing system back to the electrical system ground) and why not having one, or having an improper one, can be lethal.

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