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subpanel wiring


jodil
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Originally posted by jodil

I have a furious homeowner who is claiming that his subpanel in his garage is not a "subpanel." There is one meter and he claims that both panels (house panel and garage panel) both have sep. feeds off the meter. Can this be right?

thanks,

Jodi

And if this was the case, how could I tell?

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Yes, that is quite possible.

It would be like a large home where you have 2x 200 amp panels (total of 400 amp service to the home) run off of the same meter.

You can usually tell by checking each panel. If you don't see feeder wires (labeled or not) run to the other panel, that should tell you power is coming from elsewhere...... such as from the meter.

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Originally posted by Brandon Whitmore

Yes, that is quite possible.

It would be like a large home where you have 2x 200 amp panels (total of 400 amp service to the home) run off of the same meter.

You can usually tell by checking each panel. If you don't see feeder wires (labeled or not) run to the other panel, that should tell you power is coming from elsewhere...... such as from the meter.

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Originally posted by jodil

Originally posted by jodil

I have a furious homeowner who is claiming that his subpanel in his garage is not a "subpanel." There is one meter and he claims that both panels (house panel and garage panel) both have sep. feeds off the meter. Can this be right?

thanks,

Jodi

And if this was the case, how could I tell?

Certainly it's possible. It's actually rather common in my area. To tell, you'd have to follow the feeders. Of course, each panel has to be listed for use as service equipment.

The sorry news for your homeowner is that all of the main disconnects (up to six are allowed) have to be grouped together in one location - 225.33.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Originally posted by jodil

So Jim, Does this mean there cannot be a main disconnect at the garage panel and another main disconnect in the house panel? Cuz thats how it currently is wired. Im going back out there tonight to eat crow...

Tough position. You've got to approach him with your hat in your hand and then point out that the situation is wrong for a different reason. He'll react badly because, in his mind, you already lost credibility.

Yes. In a single family dwelling, there's no question that all of the main disconnects are supposed to be grouped in the same location. I've seen situations where the AHJ allowed this if each disconnect had a permanently mounted sign explaining where the other disconnect was, but that was in commercial buildings. There's really no excuse for this kind of gaffe in a house.

The proper solution would probably be to install a main disconnect at the meter.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Originally posted by Jim Katen

Originally posted by jodil

So Jim, Does this mean there cannot be a main disconnect at the garage panel and another main disconnect in the house panel? Cuz thats how it currently is wired. Im going back out there tonight to eat crow...

Tough position. You've got to approach him with your hat in your hand and then point out that the situation is wrong for a different reason. He'll react badly because, in his mind, you already lost credibility.

Yes. In a single family dwelling, there's no question that all of the main disconnects are supposed to be grouped in the same location. I've seen situations where the AHJ allowed this if each disconnect had a permanently mounted sign explaining where the other disconnect was, but that was in commercial buildings. There's really no excuse for this kind of gaffe in a house.

The proper solution would probably be to install a main disconnect at the meter.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Jodi,

I am guesing that the homeowner is the seller and you did the inspection for a buyer?

Is the homeowner your client? If not, should you tell him about the problem with 225.33. before telling your client about the error(s) and sending them an ammended report (and letting them decide whether to mention it or not)?

I can see talking to the homeowner about the findings on your original report (assuming the client released the report to him), but wouldn't you need your clients permission to mention the 225.33. issue?

Or, I am overthinking the entire thing?

Good luck. Screwing up sucks, but we have all done it.

Tim

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