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Burned SE cables


Bain
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I looked at a duplex today, and both panels--one for up, one for down--contained a wicked melted SE cable. My first thought was that the exterior pigtail to the service drop was loose. But the three cables weren't connected at the same point.

One panel was tied into the bottom of the service-drop cable, while the second was connected eight or ten inches upstream. I didn't take a photo of the service drop, but you can sort of see it above my truck in the last photo.

I realize the burned cables could have loose connections in the panels, but that seems too coincidental.

Any ideas?

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Originally posted by Bain

I looked at a duplex today, and both panels--one for up, one for down--contained a wicked melted SE cable. My first thought was that the exterior pigtail to the service drop was loose. But the three cables weren't connected at the same point.

One panel was tied into the bottom of the service-drop cable, while the second was connected eight or ten inches upstream. I didn't take a photo of the service drop, but you can sort of see it above my truck in the last photo.

I realize the burned cables could have loose connections in the panels, but that seems too coincidental.

Any ideas?

If the burning is only near the connection, that almost always means that the connection is or was loose.

If the same electrician wired both units at the same time, it isnt' unusual for him to have made the same error.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Sometimes the obvious is simply the obvious, I s'pose.

And the SE cables weren't the scariest thing I found in the duplex. Imagine my surprise as my flashlight illuminated the lady in the attic and my brain tried to process what it was seeing.

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Originally posted by Bain

Sometimes the obvious is simply the obvious, I s'pose.

And the SE cables weren't the scariest thing I found in the duplex. Imagine my surprise as my flashlight illuminated the lady in the attic and my brain tried to process what it was seeing.

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There must be a gas leak at that heater that done her in[:-paperba

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Originally posted by Jim Katen

Originally posted by Bain

I looked at a duplex today, and both panels--one for up, one for down--contained a wicked melted SE cable. My first thought was that the exterior pigtail to the service drop was loose. But the three cables weren't connected at the same point.

One panel was tied into the bottom of the service-drop cable, while the second was connected eight or ten inches upstream. I didn't take a photo of the service drop, but you can sort of see it above my truck in the last photo.

I realize the burned cables could have loose connections in the panels, but that seems too coincidental.

Any ideas?

If the burning is only near the connection, that almost always means that the connection is or was loose.

If the same electrician wired both units at the same time, it isnt' unusual for him to have made the same error.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Agreed. (As if Katen needs my support) - Note that all three main lugs have the screws heads stripped out. There was an amateur afoot, or a careless pro.

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Note that all three main lugs have the screws heads stripped out. There was an amateur afoot, or a careless pro.

For the record, when I'm tightening the lugs on smoking SEC's I too tend to over do it and turn until the screw head gives.

edit: Lord, why didn't someone tell me I had overdue in place of over do. Walter must be on vacation.

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Originally posted by Chad Fabry

The rule is tighten it down until it starts to go easy, then back it off 1/4 turn

If it starts to go "easy' you done gone too far. I think Jeremy is funnin us. He knows fasteners. His hands have been dirty most of his adult life.

Sorry. Old wrench bending humor.[:-crazy]

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I learned something from Hansen a while back. The paste serves as a lubricant to allow the multi strand to be properly torqued. Sorta like engine building.

There are no specific requirements for using the paste.

For the record, I've never seen an electrician with a torque wrench at a residence.

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I have never seen an electrician carrying a torque wrench, although I am sure there is one out there somewhere that does. I have seen the allen type set lug rounded off inside. That would be tight enough right?

Kurt,

Is the fire chief or someone from that department doing the electrical inspections for your municipalities?

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[:-bonc01]

So true.....

The spliced neutral thing was from many years ago in Michigan.

In Chicago, the inspectors are union brothers, and have a modicum of knowledge.

It's the building inspectors where you get the 19 year olds. Literally. There was a broohah a few years back where they got busted for hiring a bunch of 19-20 year olds as building inspectors; they were all union steward relatives.

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