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Water heater protection


swarga
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I need the Earliest code reference for protecting the water heater from vehicle damage. Was it in 1994?

I inspected a home built in 2000. The local AHJ is still using the 94 UMC and the 97 UBC

No bollard in front of the water heater. The builder said if I could prove that it is in the code that was in effect at the time of construction he would install a bollard. If not he wants me to inform my client that it is just a safety upgrade.

HELPid="size4"> I want to tell the builder where he can stick the bollard.

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Originally posted by swarga

Thanks,

Does anyone have a copy of that reference.

It's not that I don't trust Crusty, but I don't want to give the builder any wiggle room.

I've got the Oregon codes back to '89. However, they're heavily ammended so they're probably not exactly what you're looking for. Still, they may be of some use. . .

The requirement for a barrier first appears in the '95 edition. This portion of our code is taken from the IAPMO crowd. It's in our section 3310.3 and reads as follows:

3310.3 All water heaters installed in areas where they may be subjected to mechanical damage shall be suitably guarded against such damage by being installed behind adequate barriers or by being elevated or located out of the normal path of a vehicle using any such garage.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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  • 4 years later...

Vice starting a new topic figured I'd leach off of this one.

M1307.3.1 Protection from impact - Appliance located in a garage or carport shall be protected from impact by automobiles.

I have yet to see where it is written "how" to protect or what is adequate protection. Or am I reading this wrong? It says provide protection, but I could put a card board box in from of the WH and call it protection.

This is the reason for my question. They say the appliances are protected. BTW, if you can't see, the posts are NOT sunken into the concrete.

How would you call this?

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tn_200927223312_Bollards.jpg

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Hi,

My bollard is my garage gage. I have to put my front bumper right against it and lock the emergency brake. If I don't, I don't have enough room to close the danged door with the ladders strapped on. [:-bonc01]

Around here, most of them are 4" steel pipe welded to a steel flange secured to the floor with four 1/2" mollys. Obviously, like the barricade in the picture above, it's not going to stop anyone hellbent on hitting the equipment, but it's enough to seriously damage the front end of someone's car if they come into the garage too fast and prang that thing. I think it would probably stop me once if my foot accidentally slipped off the brake and I lurched forward. After that, I'd probably be putting in another but my equipment wouldn't be damaged. That's the point, isn't it?

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Vice starting a new topic figured I'd leach off of this one.

M1307.3.1 Protection from impact - Appliance located in a garage or carport shall be protected from impact by automobiles.

I have yet to see where it is written "how" to protect or what is adequate protection. Or am I reading this wrong? It says provide protection, but I could put a card board box in from of the WH and call it protection.

This is the reason for my question. They say the appliances are protected. BTW, if you can't see, the posts are NOT sunken into the concrete.

How would you call this?

Oregon gives us a spiffy drawing.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Download Attachment: icon_adobe.gif Vehicle Barriers.pdf

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Vice starting a new topic figured I'd leach off of this one.

M1307.3.1 Protection from impact - Appliance located in a garage or carport shall be protected from impact by automobiles.

I have yet to see where it is written "how" to protect or what is adequate protection. Or am I reading this wrong? It says provide protection, but I could put a card board box in from of the WH and call it protection.

This is the reason for my question. They say the appliances are protected. BTW, if you can't see, the posts are NOT sunken into the concrete.

How would you call this?

Click to Enlarge
tn_200927223312_Bollards.jpg

34.02 KB

John, that looks like it is intended to keep the kids away from the appliances. It would need to be pulled out to service the furnace, so I'd guess it's just freestanding? It's not clear to me if the appliances are on the back or side walls. If the latter, as "vehicle protection" it might actually be worse than nothing. A car hitting the corner of that "fence" would push the whole thing along towards the rear of the garage, forcing the return plenum towards the furnace and then, possibly, move the furnace and damage the gas lines.

If it's the back wall, and it's sturdily constucted including hitting studs, not just the drywall, I'd say it's probably effective assuming you don't mind damaging the house structure!

I usally go with the following, including a photo with a "cartoon" post added...

Safety Concern: Gas appliances and/or gas piping should be protected from vehicles in garages to prevent potentially catastrophic damage to the gas lines. This is normally accomplished with a sturdy, concrete filled, steel post securely bolted to, or embedded into, the concrete slab, although other methods may be acceptable. Appropriate protection should be provided in this garage.

In your case I'd probably add "The current wood fencing does not provide adequate (or appropriate) protection."

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