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York Affinity Modulating Furnace Venting


bay_dragon
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I have a brand new Trane York Affinity high efficiency furnace.

It seems to be a nice unit except I think the installer put it in wrong.

In cold weather the intake pipe freezes up with condensate from the exhaust gasses. I also think he installed the pipes too close to my dryer vent. Is there a specification about proximity to these vents?

Also the pipes are just plumbed out the side wall with no vent covers. Is this a normal installation?

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Originally posted by energy star

well, you should have been left an instruction booklet? But when PVC venting started to take hold the kit was basically just a PVC 90 on each pipe. One turned down and on turned up with a 90 on it. Now everyone uses a concentric type.

http://www.htproducts.com/literature/lp-166.pdf

No instruction booklet was left. Figures.

I did find a few kits on the internet.

Another question. Should my inside pipes be insulated? The intake produces a fair amount of condensation in cold weather.

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You don't need to insulate the exhaust pipe.

The problem is the moist exhaust gas is coming back into the intake from the where it discharges outside. It starts to freeze, the fresh air gets cut off and the furnaces stops running. Is there a screen on the fresh air intake?

If it is a separate exhaust and intake a simple fix would be to put a 90 degree elbow on the exhaust and intake air, where it exits the home, and turn them so that they are pointing away from each other. This will divert the exhaust gas from the intake. You don't need to glue them in place, just put them on, as stated, and see how it works.

You should get in touch with you local Trane factory rep (found though an authroized Trane HVAC company). If it is installed wrong, and it sounds like it, the installing contractor needs to correct their mistake, no charge.

Right now the vicinity of the dryer vent is the least of your worries.

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Yes that's exactly what's happening. The condensation I was referring to was on the outside of the intake pipe. At -40c the pipe temperature is enough to build up condensation on the outside of the pipe. Then of course it drips all over my basement floor. A logical solution (at least to me) is to have the vent pipes inside each other, a double wall configuration with the exhaust gases running on the outside and the intake air on the inside, being warmed up in the process. Just thinking out loud.

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Originally posted by bay_dragon

Yes that's exactly what's happening. The condensation I was referring to was on the outside of the intake pipe. At -40c the pipe temperature is enough to build up condensation on the outside of the pipe. Then of course it drips all over my basement floor. A logical solution (at least to me) is to have the vent pipes inside each other, a double wall configuration with the exhaust gases running on the outside and the intake air on the inside, being warmed up in the process. Just thinking out loud.

Ask for your installation manual.

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Originally posted by bay_dragon

Originally posted by energy star

-40c?

yes -40c.

On Sunday it was -53c with the wind chill. Seriously.

The condensation is the basement inside air condensing on the cold intake pipe for about the first ten feet or so.

Soon I suppose there will be no friggin water in the air at all!

One other thought. If the air intake for the furnace is close to the laundry dryer vent this could be exacerbating the situation. The fresh air intake of the furnace is pulling in warm moist air from the dryer.

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How well are the pipes sealed to the outside? If you have a full basement and the temp is 60 degrees in that basement, I really don't care all that much what is around it. Taking air that is -40 outside and immediately sucking into a space that is 60 degrees (or even lower) that pipe is going to produce water. Cold ALWAYS produces water (condesate) ON THE WARM SIDE.

Try this, go grab a nice cold can of soda out of the fridge, and set it on the kitchen table. Wait a few and watch water droplets appear on the outside of the can and drip down on the table. Just like that cold intake pipe passing through the warmer basement. Or, go out into your shop and grab a PVC fitting, toss it in the freezer (that’s typically zero F) let it stay in there 15 minutes, take it out set it on the table, you will see tiny droplets of water appear, again just like your pipe dripping on the floor.

You may even have a leak around the wall penetrations. I would hope not at those temps. Sometimes with an oil burner that’s a direct vent, with an intake pipe for combustion air going directly to the burner will cause it to shut down because of the extreme delta T. Insulating that pipe will solve the problem. -40 degrees going into 60 degrees is going to cause some condensate on the pipe, and then drip on the basement floor.

just my .02

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