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York Affinity Modulating Furnace Venting


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It all has to deal with dew point and temperatures.

A can of soda may sweat when taken out of a refrigerator in a ambient of 75 F and 70 % RH, as in the summer, but if you take the same can of soda out of the refrigerator in a 75F ambient with 5% RH, as in the winter, it won't sweat. The surrounding air drinks the moisture.

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Originally posted by Terence McCann

It all has to deal with dew point and temperatures.

A can of soda may sweat when taken out of a refrigerator in a ambient of 75 F and 70 % RH, as in the summer, but if you take the same can of soda out of the refrigerator in a 75F ambient with 5% RH, as in the winter, it won't sweat. The surrounding air drinks the moisture.

I understand all that. But the fact is, the pipe is dripping.

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Wish I could see the manual.

-4°F

Current: Mostly Cloudy

Wind: N at 3 mph

Humidity: 69%

Current Conditions in Regina

-6°F / -21°C

Feels like *°F / *°C

Wind: NW at 3 mph / 5 kh

Humidity: 66%

Pressure: 29.76 inches / 1008 mb

Sunrise: 8:58 AM

Sunset: 5:13 PM

Conditions updated at Wed, 07 Jan 2009 7:00 pm CST

This is the weather right there, right now.

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I’ve found and uploaded the installation manual for a York High Efficiency furnace. You can search the files library for this file (as soon as it is approved).

In reading the documentation I’ve found these areas that deal with insulating combustion air and venting/exhaust piping.

When combustion air pipe is installed above a suspended ceiling or

when it passes through a warm and humid space, the pipe must be

insulated with 1/2â€

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The combustion air and vent pipe terminations shouldn't be located where they can be affected by wind, blowing snow & leaves or allow reentry of flue gases.

That pic shows that the combustion air and vent pipes terminate:

  • < 36" from the dryer vent
  • < 10' from the fresh air inlet, if powered
  • < 12" above anticipated snow depth

There's probably a whole lot more wrong with that installation that isn't shown in the pic.

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Intake is to low.

Is this not like one of the latest greatest furnaces being marketed right now? With that said, that picture is no competent display of craftsmanship. I bet you payed big money for that new furnace. I'd be on the phone to him, York and everyone else.

I love how close the fresh air intake is to the furnace exhaust. If you emailed that pic to York, I bet you would get a call within two hours, and that dealer would put his York dealer ship on the line.

You deserve better. Get help and stop payment on the check or better yet maybe you paid with cc, Cedit card company will get the funds back and hold them.

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The 90 on the exhaust is not even new, you can see the old pipe inside that must have been a mistake from another job.

Post a pic of the new furnace installed. We may be able to comment and help you on that.

Is this a townhouse or condo?

Post the installation instructions.

10 to 1 that the flap is wrong in the fresh air intake (far right) that looks like a dryer vent. The damper must work opposite of a dryer vent or least be pulled out.

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Originally posted by energy star

The 90 on the exhaust is not even new, you can see the old pipe inside that must have been a mistake from another job.

Post a pic of the new furnace installed. We may be able to comment and help you on that.

Is this a townhouse or condo?

Post the installation instructions.

Yes this is the latest and greatest model. the 90 on the exhaust is left over from the crapola job he did with the first installation!

This is a single family house.

I will take more pictures of the entire installation and post them.

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Originally posted by bay_dragon

Yes this is the latest and greatest model. the 90 on the exhaust is left over from the crapolaid="blue"> job he did with the first installation!

This is a single family house.

I will take more pictures of the entire installation and post them.

I love that word -use it all the time.
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Originally posted by inspecthistoric

The combustion air and vent pipe terminations shouldn't be located where they can be affected by wind, blowing snow & leaves or allow reentry of flue gases.

That pic shows that the combustion air and vent pipes terminate:

  • < 36" from the dryer vent
  • < 10' from the fresh air inlet, if powered
  • < 12" above anticipated snow depth

There's probably a whole lot more wrong with that installation that isn't shown in the pic.

Are those the minimum specifications you quoted above?

If so this installation is a no go no matter what the pipe configuration.

There is another hole available to the far right in the picture. It is from an old dryer installation no longer used. It was my first suggestion to the installer as the hole was there already. Seems he may have chosen the worst possible location to knock a new hole in my wall. [:-censore

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