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60's rancher


John Dirks Jr
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I'm pretty sure this chimney was added after the original construction. You can see the original gable vent that was pulled back.

You can see the breach in the masonry work of the chimney. That is a metal vent pipe for a gas furnace that runs all the way out the top. I know this would be a big issue if it were serving a wood burning fireplace. What about in this case? How big of an issue is it?

Also on the left of the photo you can see that there is gypsum drywall used on the gable ends. the paper is all peeled off and flaking away. I don't think I have seen gypsum on a gable in an attic before. I'm guessing this was the wrong choice of material for this location, no?

Moisture of the attic environment has attacked the gypsum paper I guess. It'd that way on both ends of the attic.

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tn_20093975825_HPIM4526.jpg

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That opening in the brick is unusual. Did you see any structural concerns with that brick chimney (chase)? Since there is a B vent running through the brick flue, the original chimney is now just a chase. If there were no structural concerns, I would let the clients know that they can't use the brick as a chimney without repairs in the future, but as long as they keep the gas appliance, it it likely a non- issue.(depending on what else you see).

I make not of the fact that the original brick fireplace (if that is what it was) is not accessible for inspection. I let them know that to convert back to a wood burning fireplace, repairs may be needed. (extensive in some cases).

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Hi,

If it's that drywall with the black paper backing it's most likely fine. There are exterior grade drywall products and I've seen a lot of little post WWII ranch houses here in the Seattle area with that black paper gypsum used at gable end walls where, after half a century, they're doing fine.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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I'm not surprise by the lack of odor. Last week I had a loose toilet on one job and the whole house stunk. The next house had three open sewer lines inside and 8 square feet of effluent and paper waste in the front yard that had backed up out of the distribution vent (septic system done for) and I didn't smell a thing. I don't know why some of them don't stink, but I sure ain't complaining about 'em.

Tom

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