Jump to content

Is this High Density Poly-Ethylene?


Jeff Beck
 Share

Recommended Posts

Six foot section that runs from the water meter to a galvanized nipple for distribution. It's stamped with Orangeburo (Orangeburg?) SP 100 PSI.

Clamped at both ends with automotive clamps so it's very suspect.

I'm thinking that it's either HDPE or ABS. Aside from the wrong clamps is it allowed for inside distribution?

Click to Enlarge
tn_200932701641_DSCF0074.jpg

92.79 KB

Click to Enlarge
tn_200932701743_DSCF0075.jpg

106.11 KB

Thanks,

Jeff Beck

Foresight Inspection Service LLC

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Six foot section that runs from the water meter to a galvanized nipple for distribution. It's stamped with Orangeburo (Orangeburg?) SP 100 PSI.

Clamped at both ends with automotive clamps so it's very suspect.

I'm thinking that it's either HDPE or ABS. Aside from the wrong clamps is it allowed for inside distribution?

That's PE pipe. Around here, everyone calls it funny pipe, which is, I believe, a brand name. It's supposed to be used for wells & irrigation. Every old farmhouse in these parts seems to use some of it indoors here & there. Neither the UPC or the IRC allow it as distribution pipe. But I've gotta say that, after seeing hundreds of houses with this stuff under them, I've never seen it leak.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Funny Pipe is a trademark of Toro and that tubing is not tested/rated for potable water. HDPE is what's pictured and as Jim said, is permitted for supply, not distribution. It's probably manufactured in Orangeburg, NY or SC.

Anyone still see any old "Orangeburg" sewer lines?

I see it every so often.

Twice I've seen houses where the whole drain, waste & vent system was Orangeburg. Very strange and very delicate.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anyone still see any old "Orangeburg" sewer lines?

I've seen a fair bit of it. It used to run from residential downspouts to the sewer system back in the day. (City put an end to that.) I worked a lot in ca. 1900-1930 "streetcar suburbs." As a general rule, the Orangeburg pipe had fallen apart, and was dumping water through the old limestone foundations we have around here.

WJ

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jim, When you've seen it how is it clamped?

As I recall, it was hub fittings with some kind of tar holding them together.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

I think Jeff is referring to the supply line application in his photos. The clamping in the pictures is the correct way to connect the pipe to the fittings.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jim, When you've seen it how is it clamped?

As I recall, it was hub fittings with some kind of tar holding them together.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

I think Jeff is referring to the supply line application in his photos. The clamping in the pictures is the correct way to connect the pipe to the fittings.

Oh, oops. Yes, what Jeremy said. Hose clamps seem to work just fine.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...