Jump to content

it's just a door hinge...


Recommended Posts

But just look at the artistry in this thing. It was in a circa 1877 home I did today. I realize that is not a big deal to a lot of you guys who regularly see older homes, but there's not too much around here that has survived that long.

This was far from a mansion; in fact, it was in a modest 1400 square foot home. The utilitarian nature of the object certainly wasn't an obstacle to including a little style, was it?

Click to Enlarge
tn_20094212175_HPIM1379.jpg

54.18 KB

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This was far from a mansion; in fact, it was in a modest 1400 square foot home. The utilitarian nature of the object certainly wasn't an obstacle to including a little style, was it?

Very nice find. Next time, impress your clients by pointing out the "cast iron, loose-pin, steeple-tip, butt hinge". That's how they're listed in 19th century catalogues.

It's actually appropriate for a modest, working class home of the period. The upper class homes usually had solid brass, bronze or nickel-plated steel, rather than cast iron. They also had more intricate details.

VDH02029-1.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dairyman/writer Richard Triumpho once wrote: "A farmer can see beauty in a blade of grass, yet still be out baling hay." I think that's very applicable to home inspections.

One of the fringe benefits of what I do for a living is the chance to see cool things, even if it's 'just' the decorative pattern in a door hinge. I've always been one to stop and smell the roses, although sometimes I do it too often and for too long. I'm sure I could 'see beauty in a door hinge, yet still be inspecting a door' if I could only find a pair that wasn't obscured by multiple layers of paint.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This was far from a mansion; in fact, it was in a modest 1400 square foot home. The utilitarian nature of the object certainly wasn't an obstacle to including a little style, was it?

Very nice find. Next time, impress your clients by pointing out the "cast iron, loose-pin, steeple-tip, butt hinge". That's how they're listed in 19th century catalogues.

It's actually appropriate for a modest, working class home of the period. The upper class homes usually had solid brass, bronze or nickel-plated steel, rather than cast iron. They also had more intricate details.

VDH02029-1.jpg

Bill, that's impressive. I never would have thought that one could work butt, loose and steeple into the same sentence without having it sound contrived. I learn something here every day.

The hinges are nice also.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...