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Single Receptacle GFCI


sepefrio
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I've seen single receptacles GFCI's that also have a switch, but not just a single GFCI outlet period. Using the test button, when pressed it buzzed and tripped (and also reset). But my tester would not make it trip at this outlet nor at the other receptacle in the other bathroom that shares this circuit (not a GFCI outlet). I've looked on the web for a similar one but no luck. Anyone have any experience with this type. Anything special or just a broken/mis-wired GFCI receptacle?

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tn_2009428161317_gfci.jpg

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I've seen single receptacles GFCI's that also have a switch, but not just a single GFCI outlet period. Using the test button, when pressed it buzzed and tripped (and also reset). But my tester would not make it trip at this outlet nor at the other receptacle in the other bathroom that shares this circuit (not a GFCI outlet). I've looked on the web for a similar one but no luck. Anyone have any experience with this type. Anything special or just a broken/mis-wired GFCI receptacle?

Sure it was grounded??

If it is ungrounded (3prong no ground) my tester won't work on them as in older 2 wire system, however if they work via button they are suppose to be ok

Jerry

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Sure it was grounded??

If it is ungrounded (3prong no ground) my tester won't work on them as in older 2 wire system, however if they work via button they are suppose to be ok

Jerry

I've got one of those here. But, the tester will trip it from the other recepticals on the load side.

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I've seen single receptacles GFCI's that also have a switch, but not just a single GFCI outlet period. Using the test button, when pressed it buzzed and tripped (and also reset). But my tester would not make it trip at this outlet nor at the other receptacle in the other bathroom that shares this circuit (not a GFCI outlet). I've looked on the web for a similar one but no luck. Anyone have any experience with this type. Anything special or just a broken/mis-wired GFCI receptacle?

Click to Enlarge
tn_2009428161317_gfci.jpg

8.34Â KB

I've mashed the test button and tripped the GFCI too. Some of them are still energized. Did you check for current after mashing the test button?
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Power was cut off at this receptacle (master bath) when using the installed test button

Power was cut off to other baths receptacles when mater bath test button used

Power was not effected in any receptacle when using the tester at any receptacle

All receptacles tested had a good ground

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I've never seen one like that John, but given the details in your last post, plus the buzzing, I'd say it's functionality is suspect and it's time for a new GFCI.

On Walter's...

PS: The tester doesn't do a legit test. The only legit test I know for a GFCI is to mash the "TEST" button. If the GFCI trips (and resets), then it's working right.

I sort of agree with the first two statements but I disagree with the last. If a GFCI tester, 3-light or Suretest, produces something out of the ordinary, then the chances are very good that something other than "working right" is happening. I think, no make that I'm very sure that the "TEST" button and GFCI testers have valid uses in our work.

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Walter, first, you don't need to be gentle with me and, second, I'm really not that confused.

Let's take a case in point. I regularly, always, use a Sure-test to test GFCIs (as well as the TEST button). Have been doing so since I started. I had one older GFCI that would consistently trip after 4½ full seconds, yet tripped immediately with the TEST button. Are you suggesting that I ignore this highly unusal result and don't recommend the client get a new device?

More often, but still rarely, I've had exterior, fully grounded GFCIs not trip at all with the Sure-test but still react to the TEST button. Once again, that is not the usual result of my GFCI tester and, to me at least, it's an indicator that the GFCI is functioning in a way other than the norm.

Now, my Sure-test may not be the prescribed, official, listed, test of a GFCI, but it is a test device not just a gizmo, and when it reacts in a manner such as described above, I have no problem recommending a "dodgy" GFCI be replaced for my client's safety.

The REAL test of a GFCI is whether it will work when needed. I quickly found that a toaster tossed into a filled bathtub takes too long to dry out between bathrooms and so, I use a more practical tool.

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"I've mashed the test button and tripped the GFCI too. Some of them are still energized. Did you check for current after mashing the test button?"

I thought that north of Mason-Dixon you say press the button.

I never saw a agfi that looked like that either.

I say "pushed" the button. I used the term "mashed" with respect to Walter. He's kind of funny that way.

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Power was cut off at this receptacle (master bath) when using the installed test button

Power was cut off to other baths receptacles when mater bath test button used

Power was not effected in any receptacle when using the tester at any receptacle

All receptacles tested had a good ground

Just so I've got this straight, when you pushed the built-in test button, the gfci buzzed and then tripped. In the tripped state, you confirmed that there was no power to the gfci receptacle and to the other receptacles downstream of it. If that's the case, then it sounds like the gfci was working properly. The buzzing is a little disconcerting and I might recommend replacing the gfci for that reason alone. Single-receptacle gfcis like the one in your picture are readily available but if there's no compelling reason for one I'd just put in a duplex gfci receptacle -- it's much cheaper.

The handheld tester's inability to trip the gfci doesn't indicate a problem with the gfci so much as a problem with the circuit's equipment grounding. I'd look for a bootleg ground.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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