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Not much into insect types or what they do but just curious if A leads to B here.

Found these little critters in multiple window sills. Any clue what they are? An interesting point, there are no holes in the screen and the storm windows were closed. The interior windows were stuck shut enough to show that they are rarely if ever opened. So unless there are opening I'm unaware of, not sure how they got there.

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I also found this on the rake. OK I know it's a WDI, but could this be from those dead critters above. This home only had a few of these holes but the neighbors house rake board was worse than Swiss cheese

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I know I know, not my job really to link the two. Report and move on, I just like to know [:P]

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Tough to say for absolute certain without seeing the size of the emergence holes, but they sure look a lot like Anobiids (Deathwatch Beetles). There could be some very serious damage with structural wood reduced to little but a shell.

You can read a bit about them here... http://cru.cahe.wsu.edu/CEPublications/ ... b1577e.pdf

Note that the original infestation could have been 5 or 6 or more years ago and the larvae have been happily munching away the interior of wood since then.

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White grub adult - pyllophagia.

[?] I usually know what you are talking about Mike, but you've got me there. [?]

Ahhh...OK...you mean Phyllophaga, Scarab or June Beetles. Could be I guess, but then why would they be at an inside window sill? From what I just read about them, they feed on vegetation at all stages of life..

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Just so it's clear, this is the one of the windows. Another interesting point but not sure if it's a factor, these were only found in the back windows, facing west. One large tree in the back yard, did not over hang the roof or deck. Closest branch was at least 10-15ft away from the house.

They were found between the storm window and the interior window on the sill. No visible entry points. The rest of home was spotless. If the current owner ever opened these, they surely would have cleaned them.

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In your first photo John, it looks like there is maybe some powdery white frass around the dead beetles(?). That would be consistent with anobiids exiting from somewhere above. But...it might not be and it's all really just a guess, tough to tell from the photos, and a good reason why pest inspections are done on site and not remotely.

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In your first photo John, it looks like there is maybe some powdery white frass around the dead beetles(?). That would be consistent with anobiids exiting from somewhere above. But...it might not be and it's all really just a guess, tough to tell from the photos, and a good reason why pest inspections are done on site and not remotely.

Phyllophaga is a genus of Scarab beetles. June beetles are just one of a couple hundred species of that genus. There are species that eat plants, poo and rotting flesh.

I can't make a good guess without seeing the antennae. Many types are attracted to light (windows at night). At some point, the screen likely wasn't properly in place.

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Cigarette beetle. Originally a problem for tobacco warehousing and processing, as the name covertly implies. They can also be found in many dried foods, dry plant matter and even dry dog food. Common in VA back when I lived there and they are attracted to light.

Topic: "Name that bug"

If I'm right, do I win anything?

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Cigarette beetle. Originally a problem for tobacco warehousing and processing, as the name covertly implies. They can also be found in many dried foods, dry plant matter and even dry dog food. Common in VA back when I lived there and they are attracted to light.

Topic: "Name that bug"

If I'm right, do I win anything?

Yep,

If you're right. A 10-year supply of Preparation H.

OT - OF!!!

M.

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Those are June Bugs. I've seen those bugs ever since I was a kid, from South Carolina to Tennessee. Best I know, they eat no wood. The feed on leaves, at night. They will fly into a house if a window or door is left open.

The grubs live underground for 2 - 3 years. They do some harm to trees and shrubs.

I say don't call 'em wood destroying insects, because you'd likely be dead wrong. But don't go by me. I'm not a bug man.

WJ

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Not much into insect types or what they do but just curious if A leads to B here.

Found these little critters in multiple window sills. Any clue what they are? An interesting point, there are no holes in the screen and the storm windows were closed. The interior windows were stuck shut enough to show that they are rarely if ever opened. So unless there are opening I'm unaware of, not sure how they got there.

Click to Enlarge
tn_200969193524_bug1.jpg

23.63 KB

I also found this on the rake. OK I know it's a WDI, but could this be from those dead critters above. This home only had a few of these holes but the neighbors house rake board was worse than Swiss cheese

Click to Enlarge
tn_200969193556_wdi1.jpg

11.96 KB

Click to Enlarge
tn_200969193612_wdi2.jpg

15.1 KB

I know I know, not my job really to link the two. Report and move on, I just like to know [:P]

The stuff in the rake is carpenter bee damage. Not related to the June bugs.

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Not much into insect types or what they do but just curious if A leads to B here.

Found these little critters in multiple window sills. Any clue what they are? An interesting point, there are no holes in the screen and the storm windows were closed. The interior windows were stuck shut enough to show that they are rarely if ever opened. So unless there are opening I'm unaware of, not sure how they got there.

There's no way to even come close to identifying those beetles without either seeing a key to their size or a detailed picture of the head & mouthparts. They could be any of dozens of different kinds. Anobiids are about as big as a grain of rice while Junebugs can get as big as my thumb. How big were these?

I also found this on the rake. OK I know it's a WDI, but could this be from those dead critters above.

There's no size key. Comparing it to the vinyl j-channel, it looks like that hole is about 3" long. Is that right? We don't have carpenter bees here. Can they do that?

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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"There's no size key. Comparing it to the vinyl j-channel, it looks like that hole is about 3" long. Is that right? We don't have carpenter bees here. Can they do that?"

Yup. The entry and exit holes are typically 3/8" to 1/2" and nearly perfectly round. They tend to burrow in 18" to 20", but I have seen burrows more than 3'. Sometimes the burrow is so close to the surface that you can almost see through the wood, the elongated hole looks like one of those instances and has either weathered or broken through. The bees are at least as loud as humming birds when they fly by.

Tom

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In Michigan carpenter bees typically go in 3/4" then take a 90deg turn for one to several inches. They may use the entry hole and have several perpendicular "tunnels", like spokes on a wheel. They can do extensive damage that is often concealed.

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The first picture looks like what I've always called Japaneese Beetles, wouldn't have given them a second glance on an inspection.

The second & third photo's are definitely Carpenter Bee Damage. They're very prevalent here. You often see them hovering around the holes this time of year if they are active.

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Those are June Bugs. I've seen those bugs ever since I was a kid, from South Carolina to Tennessee.

I was taught that June Bugs only come in green and black. I've known folks to call any beetles that have a certain shape June Bugs. When I was in VA, it was more often than not, Cigarette beetles.
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Here are some photos of bugs in my office. I could not get the earpiece off to photo the most important one.

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office pets

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From my collection of inflatable toys

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Found these in a carpenter bee tunnel

enjoy, it is Friday!!!

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