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Water heater exhaust piping


Bryan
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The attached photo is the water heater exhaust piping for a 4 story building under construction. The water heaters are "stacked" above each other with a B-vent running vertical in a concealed chase behind the water heater closet. The "T" will extend the piping horizontal to the water heater closet for the finial connection. The only exception to this would be the unit on the ground floor where the piping enters the mechanical closet through the ceiling. My question is, is a "T" the correct fitting? I have been under the impression for some time that the connection fitting in this case should be a WYE.

Bryan

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The attached photo is the water heater exhaust piping for a 4 story building under construction. The water heaters are "stacked" above each other with a B-vent running vertical in a concealed chase behind the water heater closet. The "T" will extend the piping horizontal to the water heater closet for the finial connection. The only exception to this would be the unit on the ground floor where the piping enters the mechanical closet through the ceiling. My question is, is a "T" the correct fitting? I have been under the impression for some time that the connection fitting in this case should be a WYE.

Bryan

A wye might be better but the vent tables have always shown tees there.

See the attachment from the '06 IRC. It's the same as the old GAMA table diagrams.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Download Attachment: icon_adobe.gif Multi-Story-B-Vent.pdf

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Thank you Jim,

If I read that information correctly even units set side by side can use a tee instead of a Wye. I am not sure where I got the other Information/idea from. Is their a installation that specifically calls for a wye vs a tee?

Bryan

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Thank you Jim,

If I read that information correctly even units set side by side can use a tee instead of a Wye. I am not sure where I got the other Information/idea from. Is their a installation that specifically calls for a wye vs a tee?

Bryan

According to the IRC/GAMA tables, there's never a need for a wye.

I've heard several home inspector say that wyes are required in these locations, but I don't recall them saying where they heard it.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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I used to say it, but only because it's what I always heard, and only because it does make a certain amount of logical sense relative to air flow characteristics.

I think it may have been one of the last bits of folklore I would pass on before I became aware that nearly everything talked about in the trades (including HI work) was folklore.

But, every table and chart I have shows tee's.......no wye's necessary anywhere, near as I can tell.

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