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Installation Standards for Masonry Stone Veneer


SWagar
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This afternoon I had the great pleasure of attending a discussion group organized by the MVMA Masonry Veneer Manufactures Association, Owens Corning and Pumalite (a local distributor). The MVMA is new trade organization that is attempting to set some standards for the installation of Masonry Veneer, aka Faux stone. One of the many things that came out of that meeting was their installation standards that were introduced in Jan 2009. Their goal is to first create an ASTM standard and then get the installation standards (or part thereof) codified. That should be a few years before that will happen. These standards are very close to the Owens Corning Best Practice Guide but are now intended for all manuacturers. Here is a link to the document ....

http://www.masonryveneer.org/pdf/mvma030909.pdf

Happy reading.

From my perspective, this is a great thing! I can now point to some industry wide standard not just OCs Best Practice Guide. This helps when I can't figure out who made the stone I'm looking at.

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The last paragraph page 11, they do wrong everytime. Requires a 2 inch gap at the bottom and at least 4 inch above grade.

"Verify that all flashing including roofing kickout flashing has been properly installed. Although roof flashings are not part of the wall cladding system, they are necessary for proper moisture management. Flashing material should extend above horizontal terminations, roofing material, and drainage planes or vent mat products. Weep Screeds and other base flashings should be held a minimum of 4â€

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It is straight out of ASTM C 1063 I do not understand your point.

The last paragraph page 11, they do wrong everytime. Requires a 2 inch gap at the bottom and at least 4 inch above grade.

"Verify that all flashing including roofing kickout flashing has been properly installed. Although roof flashings are not part of the wall cladding system, they are necessary for proper moisture management. Flashing material should extend above horizontal terminations, roofing material, and drainage planes or vent mat products. Weep Screeds and other base flashings should be held a minimum of 4â€

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This afternoon I had the great pleasure of attending a discussion group organized by the MVMA Masonry Veneer Manufactures Association, Owens Corning and Pumalite (a local distributor). The MVMA is new trade organization that is attempting to set some standards for the installation of Masonry Veneer, aka Faux stone. One of the many things that came out of that meeting was their installation standards that were introduced in Jan 2009. Their goal is to first create an ASTM standard and then get the installation standards (or part thereof) codified. That should be a few years before that will happen. These standards are very close to the Owens Corning Best Practice Guide but are now intended for all manuacturers. Here is a link to the document ....

http://www.masonryveneer.org/pdf/mvma030909.pdf

Happy reading.

From my perspective, this is a great thing! I can now point to some industry wide standard not just OCs Best Practice Guide. This helps when I can't figure out who made the stone I'm looking at.

Thanks Scott, this is a great resource

Seems Just cause it is a dryer climate in our area, builders think they don't need flashings and kickouts or raise bottom edges out dirt, or they pour the driveway apron up over bottom edges.... guess I'm preaching at the choir, though

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  • 2 months later...

Hi,

A few weeks ago, I inspected a very nice custom house that was about 11 years old where the guy that applied the cast stone didn't use any flashings between the veneer and the siding, where no kickouts were used, where no through-wall flashings or weeps were used over overhead doors and foundation vents, etc.. The walls were rotting on the front of the house and the clients stopped the inspection and walked. Yesterday, I inspected a very nice new custom-built house where the faux stone guy did exactly the same thing; hell, I dunno, maybe it's the same contractor who is still in business. Anyway, this guide has been included as an attachment to the report. It'll be interesting to see what this custom builder's response will be.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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