Jump to content

deck bench


John Dirks Jr
 Share

Recommended Posts

Someone was obviously concerned about that bench when they installed it. When I see these, the opening below the seat is never covered and there is almost always a gap in the back rest that violates the 4" sphere rule. I might advise my client to be cautious when there are children on the deck, but I wouldn't write up that bench in my report.

It's hard to tell from the picture, but it looks like those are metal bench brackets. All of the ones I have seen tend to be very bouncy, and I would be critical of the way they are attached regardless of how far above grade they are.

Tom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I understand the concern about someone standing on the bench and falling over. But I wonder would it raise the same concern if it were not attached? How about if there was no bench, and there were chairs next to the railing? It is possible for someone to stand on a chair. Then again, it's also possible for someone to sit (or stand) on top of the rail and fall over. WHere does it end?

Is there code that would apply for this scenerio?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I understand the concern about someone standing on the bench and falling over. But I wonder would it raise the same concern if it were not attached?

If the bench looked like it was original to the deck and was going to stay after the sale, I'd write it up.

How about if there was no bench, and there were chairs next to the railing? It is possible for someone to stand on a chair.

A chair isn't part of the property. It wouldn't be there when the buyer took possession.

Then again, it's also possible for someone to sit (or stand) on top of the rail and fall over. Where does it end?

A kid would have to climb the rail or push something next to it to get up on it. THAT, I can't control.

Is there code that would apply for this scenerio?

Not that I've found. But if there's a reasonable possibility of something being a hazard, I write it up regardless - wouldn't you?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I never thought about this stuff much until one day a few years ago I was doing a rooftop deck on the 17th floor of a downtown high rise.

There were all these multi-level decks and railings (designed by one of those celebrity designer types) that went right up to the edge of the roof; when viewed as decks they were amazingly cool, but viewed another way, they created a literal stairway up to the edge of the 17th floor roof.

As I was pointing this out, the customers young daughter starting running up the "stairs", and got within a couple "risers" of the roof edge before her paniced father caught her. Given another couple seconds, she'd have been at, or over, the edge.

There's no particularly good argument for not pointing out poorly designed deck guardrails.

Some law schools have entire curriculums based on deck litigation. There's a reason.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...