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yet another furnace date question


Chad Fabry
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There's so much wrong with the two furnaces in a double I inspected today that I get to write: 'Both furnaces are shot. The installation is dangerous and the repairs are worse. I urge you to replace both units now."

That said, they look streamlined but they're not as big as a VW micro bus like most 1950 units.

GE serial 20326318 and 20326289

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There's so much wrong with the two furnaces in a double I inspected today that I get to write: 'Both furnaces are shot. The installation is dangerous and the repairs are worse. I urge you to replace both units now."

That said, they look streamlined but they're not as big as a VW micro bus like most 1950 units.

GE serial 20326318 and 20326289

The third digit from the end of the serial number is the last digit of the year. I'd say '62 & '63. Might be '72 & '73 though.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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The only exterior photo shot I have is super blurry. I always forget to turn off my macro setting.

I was thinking 1962 and 1963 as well. the cases are modern art deco. Quite handsome actually.

I'm not particularly good at identifying cases by their design. Wouldn't art deco be from an earlier era?

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Maybe, I'm not as clever as you. I'm going to call my client to see if we can go back. My picture of the Wolverine centrifugal trap is crappy too.

Not so clever as overly concerned with design era nomenclature.

What's a Wolverine centrifugal trap? Get a decent camera, fer krissakes......

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Do you actually use the word "shot" in the report?

Uh, I shouldn't do that?

What's a Wolverine centrifugal trap? Get a decent camera, fer krissakes......

It looks like a snake right after a meal. A small melon with an offset inlet cast into the bottom that causes stuff to swirl in the trap before making its way out. I'm betting that it's an attempt at a self-cleaning trap.

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Very cool. Never seen one.

Heck, I use the term "shot" all the time, as in "the XyZ is completely shot and needs to be replaced".

I've read in other places that I'm supposed to say "the XyZ has fulfilled it's obligations of service and it should be considered fully depreciated and well past it's normal useful and statistical lifespan".

I don't think that's right. I like "shot".

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Well, I used to say the word shot when doing inspections. I was asked a few times to define what I meant by shot. I would rather use words that are easily understood to begin with, so I don't have to explain what I mean. Now I just say, and write, that it's excessively worn and deteriorated, etc. and needs to be replaced.

I wonder what Walter would think about the use of the word.

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I was feeling froggy one day and wrote something like," Mr. Roof, after serving dutifully and capably for many years, has sadly expired. It's time to notify his next of kin and begin interviewing for his replacement."

The buyer, who was a very cool young woman, responded with an e-mail the next day that said, "Mr. Bain, I only have one question. If I specify the color of Mr. Roof's replacement, do I risk being accused of roofism?"

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I've occasionally used the terms shot, toast, kaput or completely screwed up. It just depends on the circumstances and, like Kurt says, on the customer to a certain degree. I've only had one person ask me for a better definition and that was a 'zoid who wasn't happy with me anyway.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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  • 2 weeks later...

In my experience, "shot" doesn't go over well. I use phrases like... "The xyz has exceeded it's life expectancy. Immediate attention is required".

So, what are you saying; that because it's exceeded its life expectancy it need to be serviced, it needs to be repaired, or it needs to be replaced? "Go over well" with whom, by the way? My clients seem to love it; unambiguous and leaves no doubt in their minds about what needs to be done.

Immediate attention to what, exactly? What does that mean to a first time buyer that reads it?

Sounding "professional" has gotten a whole lot of home inspectors in a whole lot of trouble over the years.

Speaking plainly doesn't seem to have really hurt my business; other than to get me fewer referrals from the type of real estate agent that most of us don't want to deal with. Still, I don't market to the real estate folks and I'm turning lots of business away,...plainly speaking.

Has talking plainly actually hurt anyone else's business by eliminating the type of work that you want?

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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In my experience, "shot" doesn't go over well. I use phrases like... "The xyz has exceeded it's life expectancy. Immediate attention is required". It's a little more to write, but both the client and the RA sees the professionalism and keep me in mind for next time.

Being blunt and using language that describes the problem and the solution is a far better method than obfuscation through "professional" verbiage.

Keep it simple, be technically correct, communicate in a fashion that completely precludes any chance of being misunderstood.

As far as the RA goes- honestly, I wouldn't give a shit to know what they think.

I also try to use verbs properly and take care w/ homophones.

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In my experience, "shot" doesn't go over well. I use phrases like... "The xyz has exceeded it's life expectancy. Immediate attention is required". It's a little more to write, but both the client and the RA sees the professionalism and keep me in mind for next time.

That's not professional; it's just words put together in a way that can be interpreted 7 ways from Sunday. This is also called "inspectorspeak." It's popular with inspectors who want to keep their recommendations soft and noncommittal.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

.

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