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Anybody have much experience with ejector pumps?


Brandon Whitmore
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I don't typically run into sewage ejector pump systems, especially on older homes.

The submersible pump is a Paco model# 3ms-T30, serial: HX01641 which does not show up on a Google search-- anyone know how old this one is, or how long they are expected to last?

There's a mechanical vent on this guy which tells me right off that this was not professionally installed (no mechanical vents allowed in OR)

Here's the pictures. If any of you see anything wrong/ weird, I'd appreciate any input as I only see these guys once or twice a year.

PS: I am in the middle of the report and will do my own research later. I just figured I'd cheat and ask here.

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I don't typically run into sewage ejector pump systems, especially on older homes.

The submersible pump is a Paco model# 3ms-T30, serial: HX01641 which does not show up on a Google search-- anyone know how old this one is, or how long they are expected to last?

I don't know anything about that particular pump. But sewage ejector pumps tend to last about 10 years if they don't get gunked up with dental floss or tampons first.

There's a mechanical vent on this guy which tells me right off that this was not professionally installed (no mechanical vents allowed in OR)

They're allowed now. Though not that kind.

Here's the pictures. If any of you see anything wrong/ weird, I'd appreciate any input as I only see these guys once or twice a year.

Where does the discharge go? It's supposed to rise above the waste line and then enter it from the top.

Warn the folks that they shouldn't use the fixtures that drain into the ejector if there's a power outage. People never think about that.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Quote: There's a mechanical vent on this guy which tells me right off that this was not professionally installed (no mechanical vents allowed in OR)

They're allowed now. Though not that kind.


Since when?

But yeah, this kind should only fit in a manufactured home.

Where does the discharge go? It's supposed to rise above the waste line and then enter it from the top.


That's one of the first things that got me to wondering what the heck was going on. I've never seen one without the drop into the top of the waste line. Then again, I've never seen one with only about a foot of lift. What you can see is the waste line in those pictures. What's odd is the fact that only the powder bathroom really needed this pump, but they chose to plumb the upper level bathrooms into this as well. Another oddity is that the DWV system is completely cast iron.

Warn the folks that they shouldn't use the fixtures that drain into the ejector if there's a power outage. People never think about that.


Did that, and recommended an alarm as well thanks to a couple year old post of yours.
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There's a mechanical vent on this guy which tells me right off that this was not professionally installed (no mechanical vents allowed in OR)

They're allowed now. Though not that kind.

Since when?

I'm not sure. I first heard about it from Mike Ditty (Hillsboro plumbing inspector). Mike has been dead set against these things for as long as I remember, but he saw this coming and warned a few of us about it.

Check this:

http://www.cbs.state.or.us/bcd/programs ... method.pdf

According to that document, AAV's have been approved an an acceptable alternative to the code provisions for venting if certain criteria are met. One of them is that AAVs can't be used on sump pumps.

I've started seeing them on new construction.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Thanks Jim.

Last year I inspected a house that looked to be professionally remodeled. I wrote up the use of an AAV, and a plumber agreed with me that it was not allowed-- he repaired it. Now I'm wondering if the plumber just did not know that they were allowed, or whether this is a more recent allowance.

According to my notes, I spoke with Mike on February 7, 2008. He told me that AAV's had just been approved and would be allowed shortly.

As I recall, there's quite a history there. Studor worked long & hard to get AAVs approved in the Oregon Plumbing Code, but they kept getting shot down. So, in late '07, they instead tried to get them approved as an "alternate method" which, apparently, worked.

My sense is that the state isn't pushing this information too hard. If you look in the plumbing code, you won't see any mention of it. So, I imagine that there are lots of plumbers out there who don't know about it. The information will probably sift down over the next few years. Eliminating three fixture vents per house could save a plumbing contractor a bunch of money over the long haul.

- Jim in Oregon

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