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Here's a few survival tips for those of you about to have a whiter Christmas than you anticipated.

1. Go to the store and get bread and milk. I don't know why. It's what we do.

2.Beer. Lots of beer. You're not going anywhere for a while so, you might as well make a party of it. It's what we do.

3. Get a shovel for the house and for every one of your kids. They'll make a ton of loot. It's what we do.

4. Candles a generator and a chainsaw. Don't ask why, trust me. It's what we do.

5.When you get home from the store, stay there. You don't belong on the road in this crap. Your not used to driving in it and, you've probably had a few beers by now.

6. Some form of birth control. It's been proven that major snow storms can sometimes have side effects that can last for eighteen years or more.

7.Be careful, be nice and help each other out. It's what we do.

Good luck

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Oddly enough, I have many friends whose birthday is in September, a few on the 25. Home heating was different back then, it came with an 18 year lease if not used correctly.

Note to my civilian friends:

Every year we have someone who will not be home for this emotional time of the year, they are away somewhere on the blue planet. We will not forget they are gone, we will miss them, we laugh about them and we raise a toast to "Absent Friends".

We seem to forget the spouse, the wife or husband of the deployed. These people are the holiday heroes. To all keeping "The Home Fires Burning" I thank you and wish you a Merry Christmas.

Salute to all Soldiers, Sailors and Airwogs.

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I got 19 inches and counting in my yard. The snow is still falling. My back hurts from shoveling. I suspect my whole body will be hurting tomorrow.

I got a radon test scheduled tomorrow at 10am. It's 40 miles from here and Tom Tom says it will take me 50 minutes to get there. I think I'll leave the house at 8am.

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I got 19 inches and counting in my yard. The snow is still falling. My back hurts from shoveling. I suspect my whole body will be hurting tomorrow.

I got a radon test scheduled tomorrow at 10am. It's 40 miles from here and Tom Tom says it will take me 50 minutes to get there. I think I'll leave the house at 8am.

Might want to reschedule the radon test when the snow cover is gone. If I recall correctly, you should not do a radon test with snow cover as you can get higher reading.

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Might want to reschedule the radon test when the snow cover is gone. If I recall correctly, you should not do a radon test with snow cover as you can get higher reading.

If there's snow cover 50 % of the year then wouldn't it be useful to know what the radon levels were in winter when you spend all your time indoors with the windows closed?

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A heavy snow cap will create a small pressure differential; at least, that's what the taught me when I took the licensing. Maybe it's different now.

Back then, when radon testing actually considered things like scientific method, they told us to perform several tests and do a comparison, considering snow loads and high pressure barometric conditions.

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I got 19 inches and counting in my yard. The snow is still falling. My back hurts from shoveling. I suspect my whole body will be hurting tomorrow.

I got a radon test scheduled tomorrow at 10am. It's 40 miles from here and Tom Tom says it will take me 50 minutes to get there. I think I'll leave the house at 8am.

Might want to reschedule the radon test when the snow cover is gone. If I recall correctly, you should not do a radon test with snow cover as you can get higher reading.

It's a real estate transaction with a time fame. The test is under way. We willl see what happens and take it from there.

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The snow-cap/water-cap issue is interesting, but in regards to a particular radon test, not worth factoring-in. 20+ years of measurement work with CR/CWLMs (including literally thousands of tests on my own house) have proven that to me.

It 'might' affect the test (and it might not). There's no way to prove it without lifting the house, doing a perc test, etc, etc.

Just do the test and you should be all set. If it's a 'canister', it could be sk®ewed-up anyways...

The bottom line in radon measurement for home inspections are the EPA protocols for measurement during real estate transactions. They do not address rain-cap or snow-cap at all. High winds, yes. Rain/snow. No.

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