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gregzoll

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About gregzoll

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  1. Marc, you over-engineered the original question. If the meter is only pushed in to allow one leg, a circuit that is tied through a Tandem, or tied through dual single breakers will cause this effect of backfeed. You send a voltage through one leg, and feed through the other, you get thus effect, when you complete the circuit through what ever appliance, or load that is tied into that circuit. Basically comes down to instead of 120vac, you get 60vac through the circuit, because of load & resistance.
  2. I see the screw you're talking about. It seems unlikely that one scorched wire could have caused all of those other wires to get scorched like that though, doesn't it? - Reuben The breaker will never trip, as long as volts & amps are within its limits. If volts are low, and amps are high, the breaker will only trip if if overheats to the point that it exceeds the setpoint that it was engineered for.
  3. The key is shortest path to ground. Unless it is a Sub[panel (ie Lighting, Receptacles, more circuits) a loose connection, or lighting strike will cause the over-voltage to seek Shortest path to ground, thus causing also the effect you saw.
  4. That would be, because when the Breaker is closed, it is feeding the other leg. There is nothing weird about it. You figured it out, when you stated that the meter was not fully seated, which means that the POCO is a bunch of lazy bastards that do not care about their job.
  5. There is a video on Ask This Old House, where they Winterized a home.
  6. Suggest they get an Electrician to inspect, due to does not appear to be in best interest. Some things just make you scratch your head and scream WTF.
  7. Actually, the wire should be twisted together, just hanging from the stud with excess to catch stuff on. Of course, the Plastic boxes can be used. What do you think is supposed to be used to tie in wires for switches & outlets? Some people prefer Metal JBs, but Plastic is so much cheaper & less hardware to install.
  8. I don't believe you. Do you have any documentation? - Jim Katen, Oregon Check with local jurisdiction & Electricians. Rarely do you see #14 for outlets in new builds. All that I have seen, are #12 on 20 amp circuits. Lighting always on 15amp, most running #14. Problem is, I can back up my words by local code inspectors, and Electricians, along with NEC. I just inspected a new construction home yesterday. Lots of receptacle outlets wired with #14. Lots of receptacle outlets are sold out there with stab back connections that will *only* accept #14 wire. If you can back u
  9. I don't believe you. Do you have any documentation? - Jim Katen, Oregon Check with local jurisdiction & Electricians. Rarely do you see #14 for outlets in new builds. All that I have seen, are #12 on 20 amp circuits. Lighting always on 15amp, most running #14. Problem is, I can back up my words by local code inspectors, and Electricians, along with NEC.
  10. Do you have any documentation to back up that assertion? - Jim Katen, Oregon Yes, the NEC allows for only, and only #14 to be protected by no greater then a 15 amp breaker. Um, not that part, the part about how #14 can only be used for lighting and not for outlets. - Jim Katen, Oregon Most jurisdictions are going that route, to allow for not overloading the circuit, and to set a standard. With everything being used in homes these days, #14 should not even be on a circuit going to receptacles.
  11. Do you have any documentation to back up that assertion? - Jim Katen, Oregon Yes, the NEC allows for only, and only #14 to be protected by no greater then a 15 amp breaker.
  12. You are in the St. Louis area, every place is different. Here in Springfield, a home owner can rewire their whole home a few circuits at a time, but it is recommended to follow current NEC standards. As for #14 no longer being allowed, that is news to me & others. Since as already stated, as long as protected by a 15 amp circuit, #14 is fine. Only diff is that it can only be used for lighting, and #12 used for outlets.
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