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Pool help...


DonTx
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This pool today had one continous coping/deck. I'm guessing, (judging by the date on the pool heater) that this pool was constructed around 1993. It appears the pool shell may have been replastered but I don't think the spa was.

There are cracks in the mortor between the stone just about where the coping would meet a deck on most pools. Is this a concern or just typical mortar curing. Photo's 1 and 2

Also, in the spa there appears to be some spots worn through the plaster. Not rusting, just looked like bare spots. Photo 3

Photo's 4 and 6 are some staining on the pool shell. Is this typical?

And while I'm at it, on photo 6, are the intakes suppose to more than 3 foot apart or within 3 foot?

Donald

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The deck has settled and broken at the outside edge of the beam at the top of the shell of the pool.

The marcite is shot. The staining is pitting of the surface. It needs resurfacing.

The suction inlets are too close together. If you don't have 3' of room, you put them on 2 different planes. They need anti-vortex covers and suction relief devices.

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Mark is absolutely correct so what's new?. As to the deck it appears to be what we refer to as an over-pour. That is when the deck and would be coping are a single pour. We commonly see this when the deck is stamped concrete. In this case it appears flagstone was installed over the concrete. This type of deck has lost it's popularity due to the fact that the cracks you saw enevitably occur. In the usual installation the cold joint between the coping and concrete deck serve as a natural control joint or crack. The resulting crack is symmetrical and usually goes unnoticed unless differential settlement occurs. How did I do Mark?

NORM SAGE

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