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Should i avoid a poly-b piping house


datasunny
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Hi all,

In a market of buying a house, but after inspection, it turns out it has poly-b piping system (with copper fitting and crisp) for both water main and radiant heat. The house was built in 1996.

Should I avoid this house? I'm living in Vancouver, BC.

The deadline of subject removal date is today! Your professional feedback is highly appreciated!

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Obviously your HI stated that there are known problems associated with this type of plumbing. What you're asking though, in so many words, is should I buy this home. That and you have to make up your mind in what little is left of today. Let me consult my tea leaves - hmmm, they say ask tomorrow, the future is unclear.

All kidding aside, you can't really expect a HI here to give you proper console on whether or not you should buy this house can you?

If you love the home, and just have to have it, ask for an extension so that you can get opinions/bids from three plumbing firms in your area.

One other question, why is the deadline today? Did they only give you two days to get a HI completed?

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HI didn't really mention the known problems, he only mentioned the radiant system using with poly-b need regular maintenance (flushing + addictive) or add a oxygen barrier(?). I did some research on-line and found that this poly-b could be a potential problem.

Was my bad to schedule an inspection so close to deadline.

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I actually lived in a house for 13 years that had PB and I never had one leak and I sold the house with the PB still in place. The buyer wanted me to replace it and I passed on that request. The buyer moved in and within a few months they replaced the piping.

So I think it all depends on how comfortable you can get with knowing it's there and when, if ever, it will become a problem. You also have to consider resale. If you don't replace the next buyer may want you to replace it when you sell.

I would make sure that there are no current leaks with the system.

I would look to see how hard it would be to replace (slab, 2 story bigger house)

I would also want to know if it has Big Blue between the meter and the house. If it does have big blue it will eventually break if it is the 160 psi version.

As an inspector it seems year to year I see less PB. Maybe it is slowly being replaced.

You may also want to ask a local plumbers opinion.

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HI didn't really mention the known problems, he only mentioned the radiant system using with poly-b need regular maintenance (flushing + addictive) or add a oxygen barrier(?). I did some research on-line and found that this poly-b could be a potential problem.

Was my bad to schedule an inspection so close to deadline.

If the radiant system is PolyB tubing, I would suggest you look for another home.

Nother thing, don't blame yourself for scheduling your last minute inspection..reeltours and their inspection team like it that way.

Next time consult an independent inspector who will work for you and not the reeltur.

Good Luck,

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The highest failure rates were the plastic fittings as opposed to the piping. The copper fittings are good news. That said, the piping is an issue of concern mainly within the context of the radiant heat, as that will be the toughest to deal with. As suggested above, I would recommend that analysis of the heating system be top priority.

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HI didn't really mention the known problems, he only mentioned the radiant system using with poly-b need regular maintenance (flushing + addictive) or add a oxygen barrier(?). I did some research on-line and found that this poly-b could be a potential problem.

Was my bad to schedule an inspection so close to deadline.

If the radiant system is PolyB tubing, I would suggest you look for another home.

Nother thing, don't blame yourself for scheduling your last minute inspection..reeltours and their inspection team like it that way.

Next time consult an independent inspector who will work for you and not the reeltur.

Good Luck,

Thanks for the reply. Could you elaborate more about why the poly-b radiant system is bad? cost too much to maintain or it's sth permanently damaged?

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Was my bad to schedule an inspection so close to deadline.

Sounds like 90% of the calls I get. [:D]

Like the others have stated, only you can make the call. I did a house a few weeks ago that had PB in it, the sellers paid to have the whole home re-plumbed. I heard through the grapevine that bill was about 3k. Not the end of the world of you really want the house.

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Was my bad to schedule an inspection so close to deadline.

Sounds like 90% of the calls I get. [:D]

Like the others have stated, only you can make the call. I did a house a few weeks ago that had PB in it, the sellers paid to have the whole home re-plumbed. I heard through the grapevine that bill was about 3k. Not the end of the world of you really want the house.

But what about radiant system? how much it will take to replace the poly-b pipes there? a whole lot i guess.

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But what about radiant system? how much it will take to replace the poly-b pipes there? a whole lot i guess.

As inspector's we can't even begin to answer a "how much does it cost" question from a forum.

We are inspectors ... not cost-estimators.

To get a quote for whatever repairs are needed or wanted you will need to get at least one if not three qualified companies actually at the site to review, measure, review, re-measure, calculate and then re-calculate to provide you a cost estimate for the scope of work to be done.

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  • 1 month later...

The highest failure rates were the plastic fittings as opposed to the piping. The copper fittings are good news. That said, the piping is an issue of concern mainly within the context of the radiant heat, as that will be the toughest to deal with. As suggested above, I would recommend that analysis of the heating system be top priority.

As Greg said the plastic fittings have the highest failure rate. What kind of fittings do the water lines have? If they are plastic I recommend replacement to my clients. I have PB with copper fittings in my own home and have never had a leak. In Charleston I see a lot of homes with PB water lines and everyone that I have seen with plastic fittings either have leaks or signs of repair.

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