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Right. The old wood-burning cookstoves would smoke like hill sometimes until the pipes were warmed up. There were gaps everywhere, the firebox, the lids, the seams between all the cast iron plates. The tin pipes would have gaps at all the seams too.

Once you got the thing hot, no more smoke, unless something was burning on top of the stove. [:)]

There was a damper you could close to direct the smoke around the oven and out the bottom. The stove had to be warmed up first.

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I can understand why smoke pipes are installed with the male end pointing downward so that creosote runs down inside the pipe but, would'nt poorly fit installations create risk of smoke or other combustion gas to seep inside the house?

The direction of the joints will have no effect on whether or not smoke or gases leak out of them.

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