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Installment 9


Norm
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Back from oblivion. Here are the cracks some of you requested. Which indicate substantial structural failure and which can be easily repaired? Take a shot at the method of repair and the cost factor.

Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif Crack One.jpg

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Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif Crack Two.jpg

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Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif Crack Three.jpg

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Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif Crack Four.jpg

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Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif Crack Five.jpg

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Enjoy,

NORM SAGE

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#1 is from slab settlement. The cure here is expensive, although mud jacking is a possibility.

#'s 2 and 3 are from edge curl and probably were established within thirty days of the pool being built. Fill the cavity w/ grout (hydraulic cement) and retile.

#'s 4 and 5 don't look like that big a deal to me, but all I know about pools is that you swim in them. I'd say the cracks have to be ground out and cleaned then install a structural, injectable epoxy.

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These all looks like plastered gunite pools.Pics 1-4 Have two things in common. The failures ar on curved sections and there is no slip joint between the pool deck and the grade beam at the edge of the pool. 1-4 need a different coping design to continue avoid failure due to expansion and contraction of the deck slab.6,000.00

#5 looks like it may be a leaker. I'd guess epoxy is the fix. 500.00

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Sorry I forgot to address the answers.

Photo #1. is a crack in the pool bond beam. This as well as Photo #2 is indication of a major structural defect. The cost to repair is +/- $5,000.00.

Photo #3 is the same pool with a garden hose present. This pool shell was leaking.

Photo #4 is a horizontal crack in the pool shell approximately 8" below the bottom of the tile. This defect was repaired by routing out the crack and filling it with hydrolic cement at a cost of approximately $800.00.

Photo #5 is a horizontal and vertical creck in the pool plaster which was routed out and filled with hydrolic cement at a cost of $1,200.00.

Sorry for the delay.

NORM SAGE

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