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CSST Bonding Question


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http://www.csstsafety.com/Images/CSST-Direct-Bonding-Tech-Bulletin.pdf

Either / or as stated in the second to last sentence of the third paragraph.

The clamp has to be appropriate design for the specific attachment point (NEC 250.70), i.e. a hose clamp won't do.

Have you seen any clamps that are listed for use on a CSST nut?

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http://www.csstsafety.com/Images/CSST-Direct-Bonding-Tech-Bulletin.pdf

Either / or as stated in the second to last sentence of the third paragraph.

The clamp has to be appropriate design for the specific attachment point (NEC 250.70), i.e. a hose clamp won't do.

Have you seen any clamps that are listed for use on a CSST nut?

Lowe's sells a Gastite bonding clamp on the shelf with all the CSST stuff, it's a large brass saddle style clamp, that cost around $20.00. I could see no difference between that one and one from the electrical dept for $3 bucks.

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Have you seen any clamps that are listed for use on a CSST nut?

No, don't believe there are such things. Just paraphrasing nec 250.70; I have on the other hand seen hose clamps, u-bolts, etc. So have you.

Of course. I was just curious in case I had missed something. It seems foolish on the part of Gastite to specify something that doesn't exist and even more foolish to supply such a non-spec clamp in an installation package. Listings and specifications aside, it's a dumb idea to place a bonding connection on a nut.

Personally, I don't mention the clamp-on-the-nut thing. I tell them to place the bonding connection between the meter and the first piece of CSST.

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Are you asking a question about CSST or an appliance connector? They are different.

We're talking about the manufacturer-required bonding of the CSST pipes. As far as I know, no one anywhere recommends bonding appliance connectors.

Help me get my mind around the Georgia requirement for gas appliance bonding. To me it says an electric water water heater does not need gas pipe bonding.

SECTION 310

BONDING

310.1 Gas pipe bonding.

Each above-ground portion of a gas piping system that is likely to become energized shall be electrically continuous and bonded to an effective ground-fault current path. Gas piping shall be considered to be bonded where it is connected to gas utilization equipment that is connected to the equipment grounding conductor or the circuit supplying that equipment.

(Effective January 1, 2005)

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I think it says if the appliance is bonded then the piping doesn't need a separate bond -like a forced air furnace or a water heater with induced draft.

I think I get it. If the copper water piping to the gas water heater is bonded all is good. If the water heater piping is PEX or CPVC than the gas line should be bonded.

Plumbers here are bonding the hard gas line at the water heater when doing a replacement.

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