Jump to content

Recommended Posts

This is why I love my job. This is a bank owned property and A contractor who looks after their properties called me in to see what is going on.

An issue I see fairly often with rubble stone foundations is that they are often constructed essentially as two wythes and should be tied together with stone spanning across the width. When that is not done or when mortar joints are badly deteriorated the wall looses its integrity. In this case this is a party wall. A portion of the side I inspected collapsed and the other side has no reason to to standing. The portion next to the stairway is only being held in place by the stairway.

Apparently the brick party wall shifted down a significant amount towards the rear, which accounts for the movement at the kitchen and second floor bathroom. If they loose the wall next to the stairway, then thinks will really go down hill-literally.

Click to Enlarge
tn_2015520153156_P5205263%20(512x341).jpg

15.31 KB

Click to Enlarge
tn_2015520153225_P5205275%20(512x341).jpg

16.43 KB

Click to Enlarge
tn_2015520153244_P5205277%20(512x341).jpg

19.77 KB

Click to Enlarge
tn_201552015342_P5205350%20(512x341).jpg

21.77 KB

Click to Enlarge
tn_201552015339_P5205318%20(512x341).jpg

37.03 KB

Click to Enlarge
tn_2015520153332_P5205322%20(512x341).jpg

39.36 KB

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd bet not, Steven.

The OLD stone foundations around here don't need columns installed.

My guess would be the framing stops right at the exterior of the window and that doesn't leave enough width for a double wythe of stone.

More likely wood frame construction with columns and a stone veneer.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In Chicago, it's usually partially mortared crap with the mortar long since turned to powder. Or dirt held in place with crap.

With these old stone foundations here its mostly soil and lime with a little cement if you are lucky.

Link to post
Share on other sites

A large majority of stone foundations in PA & NJ are constructed as 2 wythes with nothing but loose, unmortared crap between the wythes.

stonefound2.jpg

Agreed. I find that the the more the foundation extends above grade the more likely the foundation walls separate.

Link to post
Share on other sites

With these old stone foundations here its mostly soil and lime with a little cement if you are lucky.

Pretty much the same here. It's the one thing that Type N mortar is reasonably good at correcting. It's not so much pointing or repointing as it's squishing the mortar into the "joints" as best as one can.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Would this be double wythe?

Click to Enlarge
tn_2015520192425_IMG_5368.jpg

82.43 KB

Click to Enlarge
tn_2015520192457_IMG_5371.jpg

78.99 KB

I'm not sure what I'd call that. There's no apparent wythe, just a jumble of field stone. Kinda lousy stone work, what with the massive mortar joints.

It looks like a post WWII thing with that siding. I see that stuff on post WWII cottages and houses over in SW Michigan.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...