Jump to content

Pigtail on HVAC circuit


BlackJack
 Share

Recommended Posts

Thought I’d get some imput on this.

Outside condensing unit with a 25 amp HCAR rating. Connected to a 60 amp Bryant breaker (orange), thru a 25 amp buss fuse in the AC disconnect. Pigtailed to the input side of the fuse in the disconnect box is a GFCI 120 v ceiling fan / light fixture connection to the pool gazebo. I don’t see anything specifically addressing this in IRC. I checked the NEC, but didn’t see anything there.

Any help appericated

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Chuck...If I'm reading that right, then the ceiling fan/light circuit is "protected" by the 60-amp breaker? That has to be wrong, especially as I assume it's only #14 or # 12 wiring to the fan. The GFCI does not provide over-current protection (but you knew that).

I'd say that the pig-tail itself (or the AC unit wiring) is not necessarily wrong, but you have a seriously overfused ancillary circuit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by BlackJack

Thought I’d get some imput on this.

Outside condensing unit with a 25 amp HCAR rating. Connected to a 60 amp Bryant breaker (orange), thru a 25 amp buss fuse in the AC disconnect. Pigtailed to the input side of the fuse in the disconnect box is a GFCI 120 v ceiling fan / light fixture connection to the pool gazebo. I don’t see anything specifically addressing this in IRC. I checked the NEC, but didn’t see anything there.

Any help appericated

I don't suppose that the fan/fixture was fewer than 10 feet from the AC disconnect box?

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The gazebo is right next to the disconnect, the fan about 15 feet away from the disconnect. It is underground a few feet. Being an outside outlet is why its GFCI wired to the load side. The wiring from the circuit breaker to the disconnect appears to be #6 CU stranded. Looks like #12 cu stranded fron the disconnect to the fan.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by BlackJack

Talked to an electrican. He told me that the disconnect pnl, cannot double as a sub pnl. That the proper instaltion would be to install a sub pnl in place of the disconnect pnl and install a 220v 25 amp breaker for the AC and a 120v 20 amp breaker for the gazebo.

No, I don't think that would work either, unless the original installer installed an unnecessary 3-wire cable. The AC circuit only requires two phase conductors and a grounding wire. The fan and fixture in the gazebo need a hot, a neutral and a ground.

Are there four wires running from the breaker to the disconnect? If so, your electrician's idea would work, but it'd be silly. Much easier to just tap off another nearby outlet.

- Jim Katen

Oregon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...