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Im getting a new roof and need advice


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1200 sq ft house.

built in 1952.

Cinder block construction.

Three 4/12 roofs.

5 miles inland from the west coast central FLORIDA.

Im adding rafter and collar ties. Vertical rafter supports. gable end supports. Hurricane straps.

Then I will hire someone to remove old shingle roof. Secure planking with 8D ring shank nails. Might use peel and stick. Then Id like a metal roof, although I might go shingle.

I dont have a lot of money, but i do want the strongest roof possible. I want my home to withstand the next big one that comes thru.

Is metal really that much stronger and longer lasting then shingles?

What is the best strongest type metal roof? Ive interviewed many contractors and each has a different opinion. The contractor im considering now says any roof all bets are off with wind over 80 miles per hour. Still metal is way better then shingles and that all that I need is galvalume with exposed fasteners. That standing seam is way more expensive and no better. That the exposed screws will never leak. Im doubtful.

Your thoughts?

tks,

pa

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1200 sq ft house.

built in 1952.

Cinder block construction.

Three 4/12 roofs.

5 miles inland from the west coast central FLORIDA.

Im adding rafter and collar ties. Vertical rafter supports. gable end supports. Hurricane straps.

By hurricane straps, did you mean the wall to roof hardware? That's vital.

Then I will hire someone to remove old shingle roof. Secure planking with 8D ring shank nails. Might use peel and stick. Then Id like a metal roof, although I might go shingle.

Metal panel isn't rated, as far as I know, but the high wind building methods that I've seen place it above all shingle style roof covers. Don't install it on top of a previous shingle roof, especially in your Florida climate, moisture gets trapped in the shingle layer and corrodes the metal panel from the bottom on up. Expose the underside of the metal panels to the attic if reasonably possible.

I dont have a lot of money, but i do want the strongest roof possible. I want my home to withstand the next big one that comes thru.

Is metal really that much stronger and longer lasting then shingles?

What is the best strongest type metal roof? Ive interviewed many contractors and each has a different opinion. The contractor im considering now says any roof all bets are off with wind over 80 miles per hour.

He's way wrong. Don't hire him. There's plenty of shingle roofs choices rated 120 mph. Some are 150 with specified, more robust, nailing schedules.

Still metal is way better then shingles and that all that I need is galvalume with exposed fasteners. That standing seam is way more expensive and no better. That the exposed screws will never leak. Im doubtful.

I'm not. Just give the screws a good inspection every five years or so. The neoprene washers dry out. Galvalume is fine.

Your thoughts?

tks,

pa

High wind resilience is not cheap. It relies on all the proper measures being in place. No weak links. Do it right or don't bother.

Look for a Fortified Home evaluator or Wind Mitigation Surveyor in your area. If you can't find either of these, download a copy of the Fortified Home High Wind Standards and become familiar with the relevant portions of it. Tab those pages with relevant specs that your contractor needs to follow and make sure he knows his work must comply with them. Inspect it yourself as construction proceeds and confirm compliance.

Marc

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no quote function for me to reply.

By hurricane straps, did you mean the wall to roof hardware? That's vital.

yes

Metal panel isn't rated, as far as I know, but the high wind building methods that I've seen place it above all shingle style roof covers. Don't install it on top of a previous shingle roof, especially in your Florida climate, moisture gets trapped in the shingle layer and corrodes the metal panel from the bottom on up. Expose the underside of the metal panels to the attic if reasonably possible.

that scares me. I need double or triple protection from leaks. like peel and stick over the planking seams, then 30 wt tar paper over it all, then the final roof cover (metal or shingle)

He's way wrong. Don't hire him. There's plenty of shingle roofs choices rated 120 mph. Some are 150 with specified, more robust, nailing schedules.

He says rating is one thing, actual performance is another.

I'm not. Just give the screws a good inspection every five years or so. REALLY? If they look ok, then they are not leaking onto my tar paper?

The neoprene washers dry out. Galvalume is fine.

High wind resilience is not cheap. It relies on all the proper measures being in place. No weak links. Do it right or don't bother.

Look for a Fortified Home evaluator or Wind Mitigation Surveyor in your area. If you can't find either of these, download a copy of the Fortified Home High Wind Standards and become familiar with the relevant portions of it. Tab those pages with relevant specs that your contractor needs to follow and make sure he knows his work must comply with them. Inspect it yourself as construction proceeds and confirm compliance.

Ive been reading the codes and much of them I dont understand. I also know field knowledge is important and I might be taking some of these codes wrong. At this point, I just want to find a great contractor who really knows his/her stuff. Either that or hire an inspector (who i also need to qualify) to be there for the entire job.

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no quote function for me to reply.

By hurricane straps, did you mean the wall to roof hardware? That's vital.

yes

Metal panel isn't rated, as far as I know, but the high wind building methods that I've seen place it above all shingle style roof covers. Don't install it on top of a previous shingle roof, especially in your Florida climate, moisture gets trapped in the shingle layer and corrodes the metal panel from the bottom on up. Expose the underside of the metal panels to the attic if reasonably possible.

that scares me. I need double or triple protection from leaks. like peel and stick over the planking seams, then 30 wt tar paper over it all, then the final roof cover (metal or shingle)

Whatever you want, it's your money, just don't layer it in such a way that moisture becomes trapped because then you're doing more harm than good. That's why I suggest exposing the underside of the panels to the attic. That way, any leaks can be seen, pinpointed and remedied. Make sure the slope is 6/12 or greater, otherwise hurricane force winds might blow rainwater up the panel until it gets to a seam or the ridge. If it's less than 6/12, don't use metal panels.

He's way wrong. Don't hire him. There's plenty of shingle roofs choices rated 120 mph. Some are 150 with specified, more robust, nailing schedules.

He says rating is one thing, actual performance is another.

Perhaps he doesn't realize that we're talking about a product that's lab tested to an ANSI standard and backed up by a manufacturer warranty.

I'm not. Just give the screws a good inspection every five years or so. REALLY? If they look ok, then they are not leaking onto my tar paper?

There again, expose the underside of the panels to the attic space: you can see if it's leaking, not that I'd expect it.

The neoprene washers dry out. Galvalume is fine.

High wind resilience is not cheap. It relies on all the proper measures being in place. No weak links. Do it right or don't bother.

Look for a Fortified Home evaluator or Wind Mitigation Surveyor in your area. If you can't find either of these, download a copy of the Fortified Home High Wind Standards and become familiar with the relevant portions of it. Tab those pages with relevant specs that your contractor needs to follow and make sure he knows his work must comply with them. Inspect it yourself as construction proceeds and confirm compliance.

Ive been reading the codes and much of them I dont understand. I also know field knowledge is important and I might be taking some of these codes wrong. At this point, I just want to find a great contractor who really knows his/her stuff. Either that or hire an inspector (who i also need to qualify) to be there for the entire job.

Good luck.

Marc

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