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Electrical GFCIs and more


JeremyDP
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OK, so while looking through the 2009 IRC PDF, I spent some time looking at the electrical sections.

If all of a garage is not procected by GFCIs do you report it regardless of the age of the house? And at what level? My opinion is yes, it is reported, but since the house is older maybe have it in the FYI or Suggestions area of the report.

Same for illuminated 2-way 3-way [edited] switches for stairs.

For the kitchen, I thought I read somewhere else that if there are more than 3 outlets, then a second GFCI and circuit needs to be present. However, the only thing I saw on kitchens is that all outlets should be GFCI protected.

With these, do we need to see when the code change was put into effect?

And not sure where to post this, so I thought I'd include it here...

For stair railing, I thought I read somewhere else that the ends should be connected to the wall to prevent purse, gym bags, etc from getting snagged and causing possible tripping on the stairs. Where can I read about this? I did an unsuccessful search on the IRC PDF.

Thanks!

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OK, so while looking through the 2009 IRC PDF, I spent some time looking at the electrical sections.

If all of a garage is not procected by GFCIs do you report it regardless of the age of the house? And at what level? My opinion is yes, it is reported, but since the house is older maybe have it in the FYI or Suggestions area of the report.

Oregon has some exceptions to that rule but I still recommend adding GFCI protection wherever it's required by the latest code. I use the NEC because Oregon didn't adopt the electrical section of the IRC. There's just no reason to *****foot around this stuff. Call a spade a spade and be done with it.

Same for luminated 2-way switches for stairs.

That's a new one on me. What's a "luminated 2-way switch?" Last I heard you needed a light that illuminates every tread and that can be controlled form each floor level. Most people use 3-way switches for this.

For the kitchen, I thought I read somewhere else that if there are more than 3 outlets, then a second GFCI and circuit needs to be present. However, the only thing I saw on kitchens is that all outlets should be GFCI protected.

Every kitchen requires two dedicated small appliance circuits. The number of circuits doesn't depend on the number of outlets. A GFCI can protect more than 3 outlets. Read the GFCI instructions for the exact number.

With these, do we need to see when the code change was put into effect?

No. If it's a safety issue, I recommend correcting it no matter when the issue was written into the code book. If it's not a safety issue, I deal with it differently depending on what it is and what the consequenses might be. Since I don't tend to rely on boilerplate, I can't tell you exactly how I deal with each issue. It always depends.

And not sure where to post this, so I thought I'd include it here...

For stair railing, I thought I read somewhere else that the ends should be connected to the wall to prevent purse, gym bags, etc from getting snagged and causing possible tripping on the stairs. Where can I read about this? I did an unsuccessful search on the IRC PDF.

The end that you're talking about is called a "return." You'll find the rule you're looking for in 311.5.6.2

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Thank you both for your replies!

Ah, yeah, 2-way switches are the new thing here... [:-paperba (Just kidding!) I corrected my OP.

OK, so I have the 2009 IRC. It sounds like I also need the NEC. Any other documentation that is needed, or will help (not just for electric, but the whole house)?

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Hey Jim, curious, are you using IRC? When I looked up info on the return, you said to look up 311.5.6.2 but I found:

R311.7.7.2 Continuity. Handrails for stairways shall be

continuous for the full length of the flight, from a point

directly above the top riser of the flight to a point directly

above the lowest riser of the flight. Handrail ends shall be

returned or shall terminate in newel posts or safety terminals.

Handrails adjacent to awall shall have a space of not

less than 11/2 inch (38 mm) between the wall and the

handrails.

Brandon, does the IRC get updated regularly? Like every 3 years? I like the 2006 diagram you have.

For anyone interested, here is a link to a use group study on various people and handrail uses: http://www.stairways.org/code_changes/A ... 090105.pdf (coincidentally, the guy who did the study, is from here - St. Louis, MO)

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Hey Jim, curious, are you using IRC? When I looked up info on the return, you said to look up 311.5.6.2 but I found:

R311.7.7.2 Continuity. Handrails for stairways shall be

continuous for the full length of the flight, from a point

directly above the top riser of the flight to a point directly

above the lowest riser of the flight. Handrail ends shall be

returned or shall terminate in newel posts or safety terminals.

Handrails adjacent to awall shall have a space of not

less than 11/2 inch (38 mm) between the wall and the

handrails.

Yes. That's it. "Handrail ends shall be returned . . . "

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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