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rlskfoster
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I was doing a home yesterday with a 14 kw electric heat. I ran the thermostat up to 80 and and after a few minutes I started checking temps. The highest reading I had was 93 degrees at the closet register. Others were as low as 83 degres. This was not a heat pump system. I then ran thermostat to 88 to see if there was any difference. It did not change. I had thought maybe all the strips weren't coming on. These temps were alot lower than what I usually read on similar set-ups.

I explained this to my clients and suggested an HVAC tech to check system.

What is a "normal" temp range I could expect to see with a system that is functioning properly.

Thanks

Buster

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Originally posted by rlskfoster

I was doing a home yesterday with a 14 kw electric heat. I ran the thermostat up to 80 and and after a few minutes I started checking temps. The highest reading I had was 93 degrees at the closet register. Others were as low as 83 degres. This was not a heat pump system. I then ran thermostat to 88 to see if there was any difference. It did not change. I had thought maybe all the strips weren't coming on. These temps were alot lower than what I usually read on similar set-ups.

I explained this to my clients and suggested an HVAC tech to check system.

What is a "normal" temp range I could expect to see with a system that is functioning properly.

Thanks

Buster

Depends on the ductwork and the fan speed. Usually 110-120, but lower temps aren't unheard of. I'll bet that either one or two strips are burnt out or there's a problem with the sequencer.

Next time, open up the cabinet and snap an ammeter around the leads to each strip. You'll know right away if one or more isn't firing. At that point, you can refer it to a tech or you could investigate a little further to narrow down the problem.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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I probably should have done that. The way this unit was configured it was tough to even see the heat strip connections but I could have made a better effort. I had to use a mirror to see everything. The breakers and its mount were right in front and covered everthing up.

I was pretty sure that the temps I was getting were too low from what I always seem to see.

Thanks for nthe response.

Buster

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Originally posted by rlskfoster

I probably should have done that. The way this unit was configured it was tough to even see the heat strip connections but I could have made a better effort. I had to use a mirror to see everything. The breakers and its mount were right in front and covered everthing up.

I was pretty sure that the temps I was getting were too low from what I always seem to see.

Thanks for nthe response.

Buster

If access is difficult, don't risk taking the ammeter measurements there, you could zap yourself or short something out. Instead, open up the breaker panel and clamp your meter around one of the conductors that leads to the furnace. Look for about 20 amps per strip.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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