Jump to content

Embedding timber walls in a concrete footings


Recommended Posts

I have been researching domes, and one problem is that when the dome walls reach the ground you never have a level contact with the ground or a level foundation wall because the dome angles constantly change. For this reason I think it would be best to seal the frame at the bottom with plastic and embed the wall into the concrete footing for a complete transfer of the load to the ground.

what do you think[?]

Link to post
Share on other sites

I understand that wood can wick up moisture from concrete and cause all sorts of problems, however don't people now build wood foundations by sealing the wood in plastic and then back filling (embedding) timber frame directly into the ground. So if I embed a wood frame a foot up off of the ground using the same seal methods, wouldn't that be better then wood foundation set below the ground?

Link to post
Share on other sites

You can build a perimeter foundation for a dome with a stepped/reinforced outer lip that encloses the sill at the base of the wall and prevents the bottom of the walls from spreading and provides the support needed to hold the dome up. You don't need to encase the walls.

This is not the best place for this kind of discussion. We are home inspectors - not engineers. This belongs on an engineers forum.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes I understand most inspectors are not an engineers, however even being a home inspector, I thought it was relevant to ask this question here. Since some inspectors are somewhat knowledgeable about building codes, and in there experience, possibly come across certain situations where timber has been embedded in concrete. Then share there knowledge with me. It does happen according to information I found on the internet. What I am searching for is anyone who might have information regarding right and/or wrong ways of this method. thank you for your input as far as the step reinforced idea, I will take this into consideration. The only thing is, that a step reinforced method does not follow the true arc of the dome to the ground with a lifted footing. Although its the best suggested alternative I have heard, as of yet.

I know the question, might be a little off the normal inspectors path, but I didn't write it to offend anyone.

Link to post
Share on other sites

"Sealing wood in plastic," is about the dumbest thing that you can do to it. The only thing more dumb would be to then bury the "sealed" wood in concrete or in the earth. Water *will* get into the plastic and the wood will just marinate in it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been researching domes, and one problem is that when the dome walls reach the ground you never have a level contact with the ground or a level foundation wall because the dome angles constantly change.

You may be picturing the dome first and then the foundation. But when you build a house, you start with the foundation and build up.
For this reason I think it would be best to seal the frame at the bottom with plastic and embed the wall into the concrete footing for a complete transfer of the load to the ground.

what do you think[?]

How do you embed the panels in the concrete? Picture the forms for the concrete. Are you lowering the completed dome somehow with a sky crane?

People have been anchoring buildings to concrete for over 60 years by simply using threaded studs embedded in the concrete. I don't see the point in reinventing the process. People have been building dome structures for that long as well. Study what they did.

Yes there are wood foundation systems but they have not been highly successful. If you must bury the lower edges of your dome, build those panels out of plastic or ferro cement. Wood in the ground is just not permanent, and if water seeps in under the plastic concrete coating, which will happen to any dome structure because there is no overhanging roof, no gutters, there will be rot going on with no way to reach it to replace it.

Sorry, Jim, you posted same in much fewer words.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...