Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
inspector57

What is this?

Recommended Posts

Fungal issues are not normal in my part of the world. For the first time in 20 years I have seen this and I'm stumped as is my pest control guy. The 2x4's seemed to be the only lumber affected in the attic framing. The lumber was still in place but totally mulch.

Click to Enlarge
tn_201544141059_RIMG6739.jpg

40.48 KB

Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif RIMG6738.JPG

431.07?KB

Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif RIMG7021.JPG

373.39?KB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since we don't deal with this in my area, I have not paid much attention so I have some questions.

How is this stuff spread?

Is it wood species specific?

How do you get rid of it and how do you know you have gone far enough?

The only advice I could give is to have someone probe all the wood in the attic and replace the damaged stuff. Pretty manageable if it is only the 2x4's that I found which were used for purlin struts, ridge supports, etc. but obviously much harder if it spreads to the rafters and ceiling joists. This house was a pass by my client due to this and the substantial termite damage and disintegrated ducts but I would like to know for future reference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks like the type of fungus that only attacks wood. We talk about it a lot - poria species.

It may have been already in the wood when it was put in the attic. It is pretty common here to find it growing out in the lumber yard, stacks left uncovered. It won't usually attack dry wood in a house. It gets started when wood is wet for prolonged periods of time. It spreads by spores and some species by direct contact by growing a hairy web. The spores need moisture to start on another piece.

Get those 2 pieces out of there and the rest will probably be fine, except that spot on the ridge plank. If that is an older house, there was a recent moisture issue up there, and there could be rot elsewhere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the information.

It makes sense that the fungus arrived on lumber infected before being used in the house. It is rare that moisture in the air would be enough to support the entire life cycle of much of anything, including fungus.

Maybe the 2x4's were wet and infected enough when the house was built so that it had enough of a start to continue feeding on the lumber but not so much that it could spread since none of the other dimensional lumber looked effected. Attics hear are hot and dry most of the year but might get enough moisture to sustain life in an unvented attic during the heating season.

It just freaked me out that this was spread out over a big part of the attic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you probe the wood to determine its integrity?

Yes, mulch on all the 2x4's. A probe easily passed through the otherwise normal looking wood. The white stuff was only visible in a few locations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm stumped. Maybe drywood termites combined with the presence of the wood yard fungus. That fungus is not a wood destroying fungus and may have affected your evaluation of the issue.

Did you notice any gray or black frass in the attic? Did you open up any of the damaged wood with your probe? Did you see any smooth tunnels? If so you found drywood termites.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure looks like Poria Incrassati, like John K opined. The characteristic webbing isn't there though.

Marc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Look at the second pic along the line where the 2 X 4's are nailed together. That wood is rotten.

It may not be a familiar species, but it is a fungus doing the damage.

I am 4,000 miles NW of there, but had similar rot in joists last week. Very little fruit showing. No hairy web.

Click to Enlarge
tn_201546235735_rot1.jpg

63.53 KB

Click to Enlarge
tn_201546235759_rot2.jpg

44.84 KB

Click to Enlarge
tn_201546235831_rot3.jpg

62.49 KB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Look at the second pic along the line where the 2 X 4's are nailed together. That wood is rotten.

It may not be a familiar species, but it is a fungus doing the damage.

I am 4,000 miles NW of there, but had similar rot in joists last week. Very little fruit showing. No hairy web.

Click to Enlarge
tn_201546235735_rot1.jpg

63.53 KB

Click to Enlarge
tn_201546235759_rot2.jpg

44.84 KB

Click to Enlarge
tn_201546235831_rot3.jpg

62.49 KB

That's 'dry rot', AKA incipient rot as Mike O would call it. I get a lot of that here. It's the worse news any buyer of mine could get. Makes some cry.

Not Poria Incrassati.

Marc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is poria (the white stuff). The webs left the wood surface and wove their way into the fiberglass insulation. In some spots there was more fungal fiber than glass.

Click to Enlarge
tn_20154784827_IMG_20150406_125648348.jpg

120.47 KB

An ice dam leak above, a flashing breach below, and a leaky window install kept it very well hydrated. There was close to 60 square feet of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Contact Prof. Jeff Morrell at Oregon State University - he's the "Rot Doc." Send him some photos, take a small sample, stick it in a baggie and express mail it to him and he'll probably be able to tell you exactly what it is.

This guy is one of the foremost authorities on wood rot on the planet. Google him.

http://renewablematerials.oregonstate.edu/jeff-morrell

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...