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Year elevation was required


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Originally posted by Chris Bernhardt

Does anyone know any history of about when the elevation requirement for equipment capable of igniting flammable vapors in a garage came into the model codes or NFPA 54? I have it narrowed down to between the mid 60's and 1988 UBC.

Thanks, Chris

If it's in Oregon and you're talking about a residence, you'll want to reference CABO not NFPA or the UBC.

It's morphed over the years.

2005 Oregon Residential Specialty Code, Section M 1307.3 Elevation of ignition source. Appliances having an ignition source shall be elevated such that the source of ignition is not less than 18 inches (457mm) above the floor in garages. . .

2000 Oregon 1&2 Family Dwelling Specialty Code, Section 1307.3 . . . Appliances that generate a glow, spark or flame capable of igniting gasoline vapors and located in a garage shall be installed with burners, burner ignition devices or heating elements and switches at least 18 inches (457mm) above the floor level. . .

1996 Oregon 1&2 Family Dwelling Specialty Code, Section 1307.3 . . . Appliances that generate a glow, spark or flame capable of igniting gasoline vapors and located in a garage shall be installed with the burners, burner ignition devices or heating elements and switches at least 18 inches (457mm) above the floor level. . .

1992 CABO, Section M-1006 . . . Appliances that generate a glow, spark or flame capable of igniting flammable vapors and located in a garage shall be installed with the burners, burner ignition devices or heating elements and switches at least 18 inches above the floor level. . .

1989 CABO, Section M-1114 . . . Heat producing appliances and comfort-cooling appliances which generate a glow, spark or flame capable of igniting flammable vapors and is located in a garage shall be installed with the burners, burner ignition devices or heating elements and switches at least 18 inches above the floor level.

1986 CABO, Section M-1114 . . . Equipment which generates a glow, spark or flame capable of igniting flammable vapors and is located in a garage shall be installed with the burners, burner ignition devices or heating elements and switches at least 18 inches above the floor level.

1983 CABO, Section M-1114 . . . The equipment shall have the source of ignition combustion chamber, and ash pit, raised a minimum of eighteen (18) inches above the floor to eliminate a possible source of ignition.

1979 CABO, Section M1114 . . . Appliances generating a flame, glow or spark capable of igniting flammable vapors may be installed on the floor of a garage provided that a door of the garage opens to an adjacent ground or driveway level that is at or below the level of the garage floor. When this condition does not exist, appliances shall be installed so that the ignition source is at least eighteen (18) inches above the garage floor. EXCEPTION: Sealed combustion appliances may be installed at floor level.

That’s as far back as my library goes. If you want to know more, I can find out. Just send me an 85mm, F1.8 Super-Multi-Coated Takumar lens with original caps and leather case first.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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  • 1 month later...

Thanks Jim

I went down to the Oregon State library however they only have the code dating back to the early 70's. It appears that the requirement extends into the 60's. The question came up because I have seem some 70's homes with original hot water heaters sitting on the floor of the garage but near the garage door and the driveway sloped away.

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Originally posted by Chris Bernhardt

I have seem some 70's homes with original hot water heaters sitting on the floor of the garage but near the garage door and the driveway sloped away.

Wow, a water heater that lasts 10 years here is old.

15 years is is a historic item.

30 years, I couldn't say, never seen one working after 30 years.

If it is original I would recommend an upgrade. Here when they are replaced they need to conform to the current code.

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Hi Scott,

Around here average life is 10 to 15 years but I often see them far older. The oldest that I've ever seen were Hotpoint electric water heaters and those were seen months apart in the same town over on Whidbey Island. Both were from 1951!!!! Big tall pale yellow monsters with cast iron legs and banding on them.

It was back before I had a digital camera or I'd have photos for you.

OT - OF!!!

M.

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Over here in the city of woodburn is an over 50 dvelopement built in the 60's and it is not uncommon to find the original 30 gallon gas fired hot water heaters still chugging along even though they are 40+ years old and sitting on the floor of the garage. Outside of here its rare to find them in the 30 year range however I find an awful lot in the 15 - 20 year range.

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